Africa bonds

Senegal is days away from launching sub-Saharan Africa’s biggest sukuk, with the CHF100bn ($208m) bond expected to receive strong investor demand and create further momentum for sovereigns and banks in the region to offer Islamic financial products.

After concluding an investor roadshow on Friday, Senegal is due to end the bookbuilding process for its debut Islamic bond on July 18. The four-year instrument, which has an annual 6.25 per cent profit margin, is targeted at banks and institutional investors in the eight member West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU), though it is also open to international investors. Unlike conventional bonds, sukuk do not pay interest, which is forbidden under Islamic law, but grant investors a share in an underlying asset. Continue reading »

Following Nigeria's example?

The International Monetary Fund’s “Africa Rising” conference opened in Maputo with gushing descriptions about the “potential” and “opportunity” of the fast growing continent.

IMF chief Christine Lagarde, the guest of honour, told the gathering of politicians, aid workers and business types that “we are witnessing a moment of transformation in Africa.” Former US President Bill Clinton joined in via video to talk of Africa’s “remarkable economic progress.”

Yet intertwined with the unabashed bullishness were warnings about the potential potholes that line the road ahead, especially for those nations endowed with rich reserves of the natural resources that have been driving much of the continent’s heady growth. Continue reading »

Ivory Coast prime minister Daniel Kablan Duncan expects a sovereign bond planned by his country to come to market in July. He talks to Javier Blas about his financing plans and the challenges facing Africa.

Two African countries – Senegal and South Africa – are just months away from issuing sukuk, or Islamic bonds, seeking to attract cash-rich Middle Eastern and Asian investors to finance their large infrastructure programmes, Islamic finance bankers told a meeting of the African Development Bank.

The move represents a potentially significant boost for the profile of Islamic finance in Africa. Until now, Gambia and Sudan have been the only countries on the continent to issue a sukuk – and they were only for tiny sums. Continue reading »

The Zambian kwacha has been one of the weakest currencies against the US dollar this year, losing more than 8 per cent of its value against the world’s reserve currency during the past month alone.

Source: Thomson Reuters

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The discovery of oil and a rising consumer class had investors positive about Ghana’s growth story, holding up the west-African country as one of the frontier markets to invest in. But the recent broad sell-off in EMs has changed the mood about the country and exposed a slate of problems in need of resolution.

Source: Thomson Reuters

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Kenyan officials are on a round of investment meetings in London to discuss the country’s debut eurobond, pegged at $2bn, says the central bank. But market volatility is proving a nuisance and Kenya could be forced to delay the much-anticipated bond.

On Tuesday, analysts at Fitch Ratings said in a teleconference in London that the issue was unlikely to take place before April. Those remarks contrast with those of Kenyan officials, who reportedly said on Monday they were going ahead with plans to issue this month. So, is it going to happen? Continue reading »

Tapping bond markets is something of a trend for many African countries in the past year, including Gabon this month with a $1.5bn 10-year eurobond priced to yield 6.375 per cent.

But selling long-term debt is proving a hard game in east Africa, despite the presumable attractions of political stability and a favourable business environment. Interest costs for government securities are high, with long-term instruments maintaining yields of about 10 per cent or more, creating a growing concern for central banks. Continue reading »

Gabon joined the year’s rostrum of sovereign African eurobond issuers on Thursday with a 10 year “soft bullet” issue of $1.5bn priced to yield 6.375 per cent.

It follows comparable landmark issues over the past 15 months from Zambia, Rwanda, Nigeria and Ghana. So how does it stack up? Continue reading »

African growth is soaring away, as anyone who has looked at the IMF figures can tell you. Meanwhile, governments are able to tap the international debt markets, as investors are still willing to snap up bonds from established and first-time issuers.

So credit ratings should be on the up too, shouldn’t they? If debt is backed by growth, doesn’t credit risk decrease? Not so fast, says Standard and Poor’s. Continue reading »

What do you do when you get downgraded by a major credit rating agency, citing deteriorating government finances and macroeconomic policies that “could deter investment”?

Issue more debt! Or at least that’s the possible plan from Zambia, once a credit darling issuing a eurobond at 5.75 per cent (cheaper than Spain, as everyone noted at the time), but now rated just ‘B’ by Fitch after a downgrade on Monday. That’s the same level as on-the-brink Ukraine, and just one notch above Greece, Egypt and Argentina. Continue reading »

Florian von Hartig of Standard Bank

With nearly two months of the issuance calendar remaining until year end, African sovereign issuers have raised nearly double the amount of funding ($6.35bn) in the eurobond market compared to 2012.

While still representing a sliver of the total EM sovereign issuance in cross-border capital markets, African sovereigns – both seasoned and first-time issuers – are offering international fixed income investors a compelling investment case when confronted with insipid recovery and low rates offered from developed markets, lingering peripheral eurozone debt woes, and overall weariness towards undifferentiated traditional EM sovereign plays. Continue reading »

Less than three years since civil war erupted in Ivory Coast it’s back to business as usual. Growth rates are now among the highest in Africa and the west African nation is set to return to international capital markets as it looks to finance infrastructure projects and pay off debt. Continue reading »

Sometimes you get lucky – the International Finance Corporation certainly did when it picked Thursday to launch its first local currency bond in Zambia.

As the US Federal Reserve confounded analysts by announcing that it will keep its quantitative easing programme steady at $85bn a month, prompting a rally in emerging market assets, the private sector arm of the World Bank issued a $150m ($28.5m) kwacha-denominated note at 15 per cent. The four-year “Zambezi” bond is the first issued by a foreign organisation in Zambia’s domestic market, and will raise money for IFC’s local operations, officials told beyondbrics. Continue reading »

It’s a sign of the times. Ghana on Thursday raised $750m from the sale of 10-year eurobonds, but the deal did not come easy.

With investors more cautious about lending to frontier countries with shaky finances following June’s violent market rout, Ghana had to pay a premium to get the deal off the ground. Continue reading »