bonds

The World Bank’s move doubling to $2bn its offshore-rupee bond programme today marks a significant moment in the international development of India’s currency. But it leaves one big question unanswered: what should these new Indian instruments be called?

Offshore debt naming is not difficult: just pick a food or animal commonly linked to the country in question, and add extra points for alliteration. Continue reading »

By Samuel George of the Bertelsmann Foundation

On February 18 the Republic of Argentina submitted a petition to the US Supreme Court requesting a judicial review of a 2012 decision from the New York Second Circuit Court. That ruling found illegal Argentine payments on restructured sovereign debt if the country did not also service investors who had not accepted the haircut on the non-performing bonds.

If the Second Circuit Court ruling stands, it will set a precedent that holdouts could eventually be paid in full. Bondholders may become increasingly reluctant to accept haircuts on sovereign securities, thus complicating the ability of a distressed country to restructure its debt. Continue reading »

The discovery of oil and a rising consumer class had investors positive about Ghana’s growth story, holding up the west-African country as one of the frontier markets to invest in. But the recent broad sell-off in EMs has changed the mood about the country and exposed a slate of problems in need of resolution.

Source: Thomson Reuters

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Analysts from Bank of America Merrill Lynch think that China will experience its “Bear Stearns moment” on Friday, when the country will probably see as its first ever bond default.

That is a bold, attention-seeking call that is also patently ridiculous. Continue reading »

A Chinese corporate bond was heading on Tuesday for default, potentially puncturing some of the optimism that has galvanised a booming $12tn corporate debt market.

Shanghai Chaori Solar Energy Science & Technology Co.,Ltd, a Chinese maker of solar cells, announced late on Tuesday that it will not be able to repay the Rmb 89.8m interest on a Rmb1bn bond issued on March 7th 2012. Continue reading »

By Marcelo Etchebarne Mihanovich of Cabanellas Etchebarne Kelly

Two cases pending in US federal courts show how sovereign and sub-sovereign borrowers in distress can get very different treatment.

Detroit, with declared debts of approximately $18bn, filed for bankruptcy in July 2013. On December 3, it was declared eligible for protection under Chapter 9 of the US Bankruptcy Code. Judge Stephen Rhodes of the US Bankruptcy Court noted that Detroit had negotiated in bad faith with its more than 100,000 creditors; however, he also expressed the view that negotiation was impracticable. Continue reading »

There has been a relief rally in Ukrainian assets with the uneventful passing of Tuesday morning’s rumoured deadline for Ukrainian troops in Crimea to surrender to the peninsula’s Russian occupiers. Vladimir Putin appeared to pull further back from armed conflict in a mid-day press conference, so the rally may have more legs.

But yields are still at the brink.

Source: Thomson Reuters

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We did this a couple of days ago but here it is again: the $1.6bn bond of Naftogaz, Ukraine’s state gas company, due on September 30. If 30 per cent in less than eight months wasn’t apocalyptic enough, its yield has now gone to 34 per cent and counting. Does this look like some kind of endgame?

Source: Thomson Reuters

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Which tapering programme is bigger – the US Fed’s or China’s? Of course, the two processes are different in several aspects, but each represents an unwinding of monetary stimulus for the global economy.

The question is particularly topical after US Fed Chairman Janet Yellen reaffirmed her commitment this week to keep reducing US asset purchases and China’s central bank pledged to keep its monetary policy unchanged in 2014. Continue reading »

This is the yield on the $1.6bn bond of Naftogaz, Ukraine’s state gas company, due on September 30 this year. Thirty per cent for less than eight months, anyone?

Source: Thomson Reuters

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Finance Minister Uros Cufer

Slovenia is set to join a regional rush to the bond markets as it seeks to borrow €3.5bn, equivalent to around 10 per cent of its annual GDP, this year. The government announced that it would raise the cash largely through “long-term borrowing through issuing sovereign bonds”, with some short-term local notes also likely to be issued.

The statement raised the possibility of using the funds to help finance a €4.8bn bank bailout announced in December, which includes a €3.2bn recapitalisation programme. The government is confident that this can be met without resorting to an international bailout of the sort that has placed severe strictures on other eurozone countries such as Greece and Portugal. Continue reading »

Tapping bond markets is something of a trend for many African countries in the past year, including Gabon this month with a $1.5bn 10-year eurobond priced to yield 6.375 per cent.

But selling long-term debt is proving a hard game in east Africa, despite the presumable attractions of political stability and a favourable business environment. Interest costs for government securities are high, with long-term instruments maintaining yields of about 10 per cent or more, creating a growing concern for central banks. Continue reading »

Africa is at the forefront of bringing financial services to the “unbanked” and new opportunities to seasoned investors. In Monday’s FT special report on Africa Banking and Finance, our correspondents examine the continent’s enormous potential and challenges, writes Justin Cash.

Africa editor Javier Blas looks at the growth of sharia-compliant investments across the continent, whilst Anousha Sakoui assesses bright new prospects for M&A activityContinue reading »

As anyone who follows Ukrainian government international bonds will know, the country’s yield curve has a tendency to invert. When this happens, it suggests that while investors think things will probably be all right in the long run, they see a big risk of something going wrong in the near future.

In its latest inversion (see below), the curve has been back to front for about two months, suggesting investors were seriously concerned before demonstrations began three weeks ago on the streets of Kiev, and long before Viktor Yanukovich, the president, jilted the European Union by not, after all, signing trade and association agreements at the EU’s Eastern Partnership summit at Vilnius on November 28-29. Continue reading »

As pressure grows on public finances, the government of Belarus is mulling a return to the international debt market with a new eurobond issue. But what are its chances of success, given that the country’s credit ratings have been downgraded and concern is increasingly widespread over the stability of the Belarusian economy? Continue reading »