Cecilia Malmström answers press questions about the EU-US trade deal earlier this month

One year ago, Karel de Gucht, the EU’s trade commissioner, asked people to write in and voice their concerns about the most contentious part of a landmark trade deal with the US.

It is his successor, Cecilia Malmström, who will have to take the results of this public consultation squarely on the chin on Tuesday. It’s going to be a big (and possibly bruising) day for EU trade policy.

All the furore hinges on clauses of the US-EU accord that would allow foreign investors to sue governments in international tribunals, bypassing national courts.

This is technically known as Investor State Dispute Settlement, or ISDS, and has caused a huge international stink. It is probably the single biggest political obstacle to the EU-US deal, known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, which is potentially the world’s biggest trade deal. Reservations about ISDS are particularly strong in Germany and Austria.

So what will this consultation show on Tuesday? As far as we know, more than 150,000 people have written in. The vast majority are unhappy. To give a scale of the feverish interest in this topic, the trade commission has never held a public consultation that garnered more than 1,000 responses before. Read more

Hyon Hak Bong presenting his credentials to Queen Elizabeth two years ago

Hyon Hak Bong, North Korea’s envoy to the EU, has his work cut out.

The instructions from Pyongyang are clear: re-open a dialogue on human rights with the EU that was suspended in 2003. That’s a tall order in itself, but it is made even more difficult by the fact that he must simultaneously reassure sceptical Europeans that camps for political prisoners simply do not exist in North Korea.

Speaking to the Financial Times on a mission to Brussels, it was clear that the London-based ambassador was part of a broader Pyongyang charm offensive towards the EU. Last month, Kang Sok Ju, one of the supremos in the ruling Workers’ party, visited Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and Italy.

Currently seen as a destination for only the hardiest foreign investors, the impoverished nation of 25m would benefit from some more business with Europe (and the access to hard currency that brings). Real progress on that prickly human rights dossier would certainly help “develop relations further”, as Mr Hyon puts it.

North Korea wants the EU to stop co-sponsoring UN resolutions against Pyongyang’s human rights record, but Mr Hyon may find Brussels bureaucrats ever-so-fussy about those infuriating details – like the penal system. Europeans will be focusing on the testimonies of North Korean defectors, who describe the horrific conditions in the country’s gulags, telling of rape, summary executions, starvation and back-breaking labour in penal mines.

According to Mr Hyon, this is all a fiction. He said that the EU needed to understand who the defectors were: “These are the riff-raff who have escaped through fear of the legal treatment they will receive for their crimes. So they attack North Korea and take money to do so…. We do not have political prisons. We have prisons like those in Belgium and the UK, where prisoners are being educated.” Read more

The Belchatow power station in central Poland, one of the largest coal-burning plants in the world

While Brussels winds down for the summer and preoccupies itself with finding new commissioners, there will be some very busy people left working on a climate policy conundrum that needs to be solved by autumn. We’ll be hearing quite a bit about it, so here at the Brussels Blog we’ve decided to give it a name: The Polish Puzzle.

By October, the EU needs to agree a target for reducing greenhouse gases by 2030. This is one of the most critical numbers for the determining the course of European industry over the next 15 years, so it is not a decision to be taken lightly. The commission has proposed a cut of 40 per cent from 1990 levels.

Poland, which derives about 85 per cent of its energy from coal, does not like this target one bit. The alternative – switching to cleaner gas – could make it more vulnerable to imports from Russia, which would be anathema in the current geopolitical environment. Unless one side gives, a climate deal by October could prove elusive. Read more

When looking for scapegoats for the EU’s energy crisis and our dependence on Russian gas, it is all too easy to attack “district heating”.

District heating is the main way that cities are heated in eastern Europe and the Soviet-era infrastructure can often be wastefully inefficient, as we write about in a story today.

But don’t write it off too quickly. The truth is that western Europe is probably going to see a lot more of this technology in the next decade as it rethinks its urban energy consumption. Read more

A bullet hole in an armoured police car used during this week's cannabis raid in Lazarat.

Eight hundred police and SWAT officers besieging a village? Armed drug dealers fighting back with grenades and mortars? This is hardly familiar territory for the wonkish world of the Brussels Blog but a dramatic battle in the Balkans is of critical importance to the course of the EU’s enlargement.

It is all happening in Lazarat in Albania, from where the Associated Press has a hair-raising dispatch. The police moved in to take out what has become the cannabis capital of Europe. Incredibly, AP cites an estimate that the area was earning about $6bn a year through cannabis cultivation, which would be just under half of Albania’s GDP.

It is the timing of this operation that is so vital. On Tuesday, Albania will learn whether it has been accepted for “candidate status” for becoming a member of the EU.

The showdown in Lazarat is a sign of Albania’s intent in the area where it needs to show most progress: judicial accountability and the fight against corruption. It is hardly as if Albania’s security services have only just woken up to what goes on in Lazarat – the key issue is that a plantation of this epic scale must have been protected from on high. Albania wants to show that it is willing to take on vested interests. Read more

Russia's Vladimir Putin at the launch of South Stream's Black Sea pipeline in 2012

Is it possible that, once again, one of Europe’s biggest strategic concerns ends up hinging on a Balkan intrigue?

This time, it is the Ukraine crisis, Europe’s fears about its energy security – and the influence of the king-making junior coalition party in the Bulgarian government, the Movement for Rights and Freedoms.

The concerns of Bulgaria’s small ethnic Turkish party may seem worlds away from the geopolitical confrontation between the Kremlin and the west. But on the group’s narrow shoulders could lie the fate of the landmark South Stream pipeline, a project that many believe will further cement Russia’s hold on Europe’s gas supplies. Read more