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Welcome to our coverage of the EU summit in Brussels today and tomorrow. By John Aglionby, Ben Fenton and Esther Bintliff in London. All times are BST

The big question will be whether the European leaders who favour quick fixes to the eurozone crisis can persuade German chancellor Angela Merkel that she is wrong to describe their proposals as “eyewash and fake solutions”.

The key event today will be the Italy-Germany semifinal of the Euro 2012 championship the leaders’ dinner but we’re expecting much jockeying and market action before then.

 

10.12: If you want to watch the leaders arrive for the summit here’s the place to do it.

 

Welcome to our rolling coverage of the reaction to elections in France and Greece on a big day for Europe.

By Tom Burgis, John Aglionby and Esther Bintliff in London with contributions from FT correspondents around the world. All times are London time.

This post should update automatically every few minutes, although it might take longer on mobile devices.

12.44 Borzou Daragahi, the FT’s north Africa correspondent, reports on the response to the French election results in the Arab world:

Across a region undergoing tumultous change, many greeted the fall of Nicolas Sarkozy with glee, hopeful it would spell the end of French foreign policies considered too Atlantacist, pro-Israel and anti-immigrant.

Though many Libyans hailed Mr Sarkozy for his role in spearheading Nato’s help in toppling Col Muammer Gaddafi, others remember his administration’s cozy ties with deposed Tunisian leader Zein el Abidine ben Ali and Egypt’s former President Hosni Mubarak.

Ties between Tunisia’s new government, dominated by a coalition of Islamists and leftists, and France have grown particularly strained. In an interview with the FT in January, Islamist party leader Rachid Ghannouchi accused France of arrogantly giving Tunisia ‘lessons’ on economic and social policy despite its own problems.

Mustapha Ben Jaafar speaking on April 27, 2012. AFP PHOTO/ FETHI BELAIDFETHI BELAID/AFP/GettyImages 

Mustapha Ben Jaafar on April 27, 2012. AFP PHOTO/ FETHI BELAIDFETHI BELAID/AFP/GettyImages

After Mr Sarkozy’s defeat, Mustapha ben Jaafar, speaker of the Tunisian parliament and leader of the left-leaning Ettakatol party, hailed François Hollande’s arrival as way to update bilateral relations.

“We are hopeful that the arrival of the Socialists will give impetus to the historically strong relationships between our two countries,” he said in a statement. “With France, the new democratic Tunisia wants to build a true partnership that respects the values of freedom and human rights, based on a strategy of co-development and shared prosperity.”

12.22 The election results in Greece testify to widespread dissatisfaction with the country’s mainstream conservative and socialist parties. Voters have punished the political groups they see as jointly responsible for the economic crisis, with once marginal groups rapidly gaining ground.

 

Welcome back to our continuing coverage of the eurozone crisis.

After more than 13 hours of talks, a second bail-out for Greece was agreed early on Tuesday morning. We’ll be bringing you reaction to the deal throughout the day. All times are GMT. By John Aglionby and Tom Burgis on the news desk in London.

15.45: Stanley Pignal, of our Brussels bureau, on how Jean-Claude Juncker  tries to keep the mood jolly with a rolled up FT.

Jean-Claude Juncker, chair of Eurogroup, used a lethal weapon to slap Swedish fin min Anders Borg: a rolled up #FT. http://t.co/lqu1jea5 #EU 

@spignal 

Stanley Pignal

15.30: FT video with Martin Wolf and John Authers looks at whether the package can possibly work, while Lex writers ask anyone would invest in Greece.

15.17: Markets update – they’re still in negative territory, reports Stephen Smith, of the FT’s markets team.

 

 

Silvio Berlusconi – shutting one’s eyes won’t make the problems go away. Image AFP/Getty

Welcome back to the FT’s coverage of the eurozone crisis. Curated by John Aglionby, Tom Burgis and David Crouch on the news desk in London, with contributions from correspondents around the world. All times are GMT.

Greece really is expected to get a new prime minister today – 48 hours later than expected. Italy, well who knows what’s going to happen there as the EU inspectors arrive to comb through the nation’s finances and bond yields surge … And policymakers and financiers are becoming increasingly concerned about the impact of the crisis on global liquidity levels.

The posts will update automatically every few minutes but could take longer on mobile devices.

 

11.31: Dinmore of the FT, his ear to the ground in Rome, says Italy’s out-of-control bond yields are focusing minds.

 

Silvio Berlusconi

Welcome to the FT’s live blog on the eurozone crisis. Curated by Orla Ryan and John Aglionby on the world news desk with contributions from correspondents around the world. In Italy, doubts have emerged that Silvio Berlusconi can remain in power as the country’s borrowing costs continues to rise. Greece is expected to name a new leader after its two largest political parties late on Sunday decided to form a government of national unity. George Papandreou will stand down as prime minister.

This post should update automatically every few minutes, although it may take longer on mobile devices.

 

 

George Papandreou Photo: AFP/Getty

Welcome to the FT’s live blog on the eurozone crisis.

Curated by John Aglionby and Orla Ryan on the world news desk with contributions from correspondents around the world. This post will update every few minutes though it may take longer on a mobile device.

George Papandreou, the Greek prime minister, caused a major surprise on Monday night and re-opened the eurozone sovereign debt crisis when he announced a public referendum to approve the second bail-out thrashed out last week by European leaders. Public opinion polls show a majority of Greeks oppose the bail-out. The PM will hold an emergency cabinet meeting at 4pm UK time on Tuesday. Parliamentary debate on the proposal starts in Athens on Wednesday.

 

Welcome back to our continuing coverage of the eurozone crisis. In the early hours of the morning, eurozone leaders emerged from their summit in Brussels with a deal designed to stem the sovereign debt crisis. The markets seem pleased but big questions on the details remain. We’ll bring you reactions, news and commentary as we get it throughout the day.

All times are London time. By Tom Burgis on the news desk in London, with contributions from FT correspondents around the world. This post should update automatically every few minutes, but it may take longer on mobile devices.

14.33: In Brussels, EU officials and journalists are walking around in a daze following the euro-summit’s 6am finish on Thursday morning, reports the FT’s Stanley Pignal:

 

Welcome back to our continuing coverage of the eurozone crisis as we head into the evening. Europe’s leaders have gathered in Brussels to try to deliver a solution to the sovereign debt crisis. It has been nervy day in the markets and national capitals – all of which you can read about on our live coverage from earlier on. Tonight we should discover whether Europe’s leaders can overcome their differences and chart a course towards recovery or whether they will once again fail to reach a deal. We’ll bring you news and commentary as we get it.

All times are London time. By Tom Burgis on the world news desk in London, with contributions from FT correspondents around the world. This post should update automatically every few minutes, but it may take longer on mobile devices.

 

 

People may be forgiven for wondering what European leaders will do this weekend since most decision-making has been postponed. (See 10.25 entry) Photo Reuters

Welcome to our coverage of the eurozone crisis. Compiled by John Aglionby on the world news desk in London, with contributions from correspondents around the world. All times are London time. The post should update automatically every few minutes.

This weekend was meant to be the moment European Union leaders came together to end the eurozone debt crisis. But continuing differences between France and Germany, primarily over how to boost the firepower of the €440bn eurozone rescue fund, mean another summit will be required. As one European official said: “We’ve lost the main parachute and we’re on the reserve chute and we’re not sure that will even work.”

 

From our foreign affairs blog:

Welcome to our continuing coverage of the eurozone crisis. All times are London time. Curated by Esther Bintliff and John Aglionby on the world news desk in London, with contributions from FT correspondents around the world. This post should update automatically every few minutes, although it may take longer on mobile devices.