Asia

Hyon Hak Bong presenting his credentials to Queen Elizabeth two years ago

Hyon Hak Bong, North Korea’s envoy to the EU, has his work cut out.

The instructions from Pyongyang are clear: re-open a dialogue on human rights with the EU that was suspended in 2003. That’s a tall order in itself, but it is made even more difficult by the fact that he must simultaneously reassure sceptical Europeans that camps for political prisoners simply do not exist in North Korea.

Speaking to the Financial Times on a mission to Brussels, it was clear that the London-based ambassador was part of a broader Pyongyang charm offensive towards the EU. Last month, Kang Sok Ju, one of the supremos in the ruling Workers’ party, visited Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and Italy.

Currently seen as a destination for only the hardiest foreign investors, the impoverished nation of 25m would benefit from some more business with Europe (and the access to hard currency that brings). Real progress on that prickly human rights dossier would certainly help “develop relations further”, as Mr Hyon puts it.

North Korea wants the EU to stop co-sponsoring UN resolutions against Pyongyang’s human rights record, but Mr Hyon may find Brussels bureaucrats ever-so-fussy about those infuriating details – like the penal system. Europeans will be focusing on the testimonies of North Korean defectors, who describe the horrific conditions in the country’s gulags, telling of rape, summary executions, starvation and back-breaking labour in penal mines.

According to Mr Hyon, this is all a fiction. He said that the EU needed to understand who the defectors were: “These are the riff-raff who have escaped through fear of the legal treatment they will receive for their crimes. So they attack North Korea and take money to do so…. We do not have political prisons. We have prisons like those in Belgium and the UK, where prisoners are being educated.” Read more

Three days of summitry between EU and Asian leaders wraps up Wednesday in Brussels with the only “deliverable” – diplo-speak for a concrete achievement – of the entire event: the signing of a free trade agreement between the EU and South Korea.

But frequently, these international talkfests are more interesting for the atmospherics than any deals that are struck, and this week the mood has been more telling than most. Read more