Fredrik Reinfeldt

Eurozone leaders back Greek rescue deal

There is joy and harmony in euro world today. After looking over the precipice, European leaders decided to pull back and agree a rescue package for Greece. At a press breakfast this morning, José Manuel Barroso, European Commission president, was positively buoyant. Europe, he said, could have gone either way in the face of the latest crisis. In the end, it decided to leap forward towards greater integration and cooperation. In rock and roll terms, the whole thing had the feel of a band, whose bickering members — after threatening to embark on ill-conceived solo projects — finally calm down, come to their senses and determine to go on tour again.

-But don’t you guys hate each other? the media asks.
-No, no. We love each other. But this time we’re going to do things differently. There will be new rules about wives and girlfriends on the bus. Oh – and drugs. Vince has agreed to go cold turkey – at least during shows.

We’ll see how long that lasts. 

I was fortunate enough to speak with Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt on Tuesday about how the European Union is going about the task of choosing its first full-time president and its next foreign policy high representative.

The longer our conversation progressed, the more I realised how damaging to editorial standards, not to mention the people’s understanding of politics and government, are the competitive pressures on modern news organisations to be ahead of the rest of the pack.  For this particular EU story has, over the past few weeks, produced a cornucopia of nonsense as every broadcaster and newspaper has fallen over its rivals in a fruitless and fundamentally misguided attempt to show that it, and it alone, has got the lowdown.