Monthly Archives: July 2009

John Gapper

I am going on sabbatical leave until late September. Normal service will be resumed then.

John Gapper

What have the Romans ever done for us? is the rhetorical question posed by the rabble-rouser Reg in Monty Python’s Life of Brian, to which the reply comes from his audience: aqueducts, roads, education, wine, peace etc. Read more

John Gapper

My weekly column for the FT this week is on financial regulation: Read more

John Gapper

Listening to a bunch of neuroscientists talking, as I did at the TED Global conference in Oxford is, ahem, challenging. But it was also gripping, even if my brain is not fully up to neuroscience. Read more

John Gapper

I am in Oxford at the TED Global conference, a melange of all sorts of talented people people making short and provocative presentations over four days. The surprise attraction at the opening session this afternoon was Gordon Brown, the British prime minister. Read more

John Gapper

I am not sure of the moral to be drawn from the fact that Citigroup, in its role as lender, has taken control of a resort hotel in California where American International Group held a retreat after being bailed out by the US government, but it is a straw in the wind.

The St Regis Monarch Beach in Dana Point is far from the only resort hotel to be in trouble as a result of the severe cutbacks in business travel and conferences following the financial crisis. Read more

John Gapper

The Federal Reserve and the Treasury must be patting themselves on the back today after managing to face down the finance company CIT successfully.

After being refused a further public bail-out, CIT managed at the weekend to negotiate a two-year $3bn rescue package with its lenders that keeps it out of Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Read more

John Gapper

I have written a piece for the Weekend FT on Charlie Gasparino of CNBC:

Charlie Gasparino, chronicler of Wall Street and champion television reporter of its downfall, is in his element. He is sitting at a prime window-side table at San Pietro, his favourite lunch-time ­restaurant in Manhattan, ruminating on the financial crisis, when a familiar face appears. Read more