Monthly Archives: July 2009

John Gapper

With apologies for lateness – travel and problematic internet connections are to blame – here is my column from the FT on Thursday: Read more

John Gapper

The saga of Chooch, the low-budget film dragged into the Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into the financial links between investment firms and the New York State pension fund, from which they were seeking business, is intriguing.

The film itself, to judge by its Amazon DVD description, only sounds worth renting if you are desperate: Read more

John Gapper

I have written a piece for the Weekend FT on Rupert Murdoch:

It is a long way from Sun Valley to the Street of Shame. Read more

John Gapper

Fritz Henderson’s remarks this morning on General Motors’ speedy exit from Chapter 11 bankruptcy were a pretty sweeping condemnation of the old GM’s culture and structure.

His decision to sweep away entire layers of regional management, and eliminate the entire group running the North American business and taking charge himself, suggest there was a lot of redundancy. Read more

John Gapper

The executive comings and goings at Citigroup have provided plenty of material for intrigue in the past year and the latest reshuffle is no exception.

The arrival of Eugene McQuade, a veteran commercial banker, as the head of Citi’s North American operations as Ned Kelly is pushed upstairs to vice-chairman from being Citi’s chief financial officer, feels as if it could turn out to be significant. Read more

John Gapper

My Thursday column in the FT is about corporate financiers: Read more

John Gapper

I was naively puzzled for a long time about how people got addicted to painkillers – what was so enjoyable about having pain numbed? – until I tried Vicodin.

It was prescribed after a minor operation last year and I suddenly discovered the alluring qualities of pills such as Vicodin and Percocet that combine opiates with paracetamol. After a day or two of pleasurable wooziness, I thought it would be wise to stop. Read more

John Gapper

If you are not certain of whether you are entitled to a piece of software or digital content, beware of storing it in the cloud.

That is one lesson from the intriguing case of Sergey Aleynikov, a former computer programmer at Goldman Sachs who has been accused of stealing software used in Goldman’s automated trading programme by uploading it to a server in Germany. Read more