Monthly Archives: July 2014

There is an argument that the latest Facebook scandal is a lot of fuss about nothing. A week-long psychological experiment on 690,000 users in 2012 that did no damage and had a barely noticeable effect hardly registers on the scale of research abuses over the years.

Andrew Hill

What puzzles me about Sports Direct’s campaign to pay founder Mike Ashley a bonus – which finally succeeded on Wednesday, despite shareholder opposition – is that it focuses City attention on the weak spots in the sports retailer’s make-up: its governance and its dependence on Mr Ashley himself. Read more

John Gapper

Oliver Chris and Billie Piper in Great Britain. Photo: Johan Persson

Having written about the obsolescence of the Fleet Street tabloids in my column last week, I was intrigued to attend a dress rehearsal on Saturday of Great Britain, the new Richard Bean farce about phone hacking and corruption in the British establishment.

The play, which opened on Monday night at the National Theatre, has received mostly positive (with some negative) reviews but I found it disappointing, for reasons related to the column.

One difficulty was expressed by my wife, who leaned across halfway through the first half and whispered: “When is this set?” That was a good question, for it appeared to be taking place at various times in the past three decades. Read more

When I sat down with colleagues this year to review a “longlist” of applicants for the Financial Times’ editorial trainee scheme, we agreed on one thing: any of the 50 candidates left in the running would be a worthy recruit. Yet following months of due diligence by FT staff, including writing tests and, for some, interviews, 48 were bound to receive a rejection letter.