Emma Jacobs

  © Dreamstime

Open-plan offices are coming under attack. Jeremy Paxman, the British broadcast journalist, let rip last week: “An open-plan office is a way of telling you that you don’t matter. Here you will sit for your allotted hours, at a work station, devoid of any personal touch, while opposite you someone you don’t know shouts into the telephone to a person sitting in an almost identical human warehouse in Bangalore.” Read more

Emma Jacobs

Fabrizio Rongione and Marion Cotillard in 'Two Days, One Night'

Fabrizio Rongione and Marion Cotillard in 'Two Days, One Night'

Two Days, One Night, which stars Marion Cotillard as Sandra, a depressed employee in a small solar-panel factory, is a modest and gentle film. Written and directed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, Belgian brothers who have won two Palmes d’Or at Cannes, the new release is a modern parable about the impact of management decisions on employees’ lives. Read more

Emma Jacobs

Max Schireson says no one ever asked him how he balanced work and parenthood

Last week, Max Schireson announced his decision to step down from his post as chief executive of MongoDB, an open source database developer. The reason? To spend more time with his family. It was no euphemism. He really meant it. Read more

Emma Jacobs

Justin Timberlake, pop star and actor, is not typically seen as shedding light on societal divisions. Yet the character he played in a film, In Time, a few years ago, was on to something. Set in a dystopian future, where time is currency, the US has been split into “time zones” based on personal wealth. Timberlake’s character, Will Salas, handsome yet poor, tries to bring down the system.
A new study by the University of California, Berkeley, has found that although time is objectively identical for everyone, time perception is subjective. The authors’ key message is that the more powerful you are, the more time you feel you have. In fact, the authors write, “powerful individuals believe they have control over outcomes that they could not possibly control, such as the outcome of a die roll”.

 Read more

Emma Jacobs

Luis Suarez, right, and Giorgio Chiellini after clashing during their World Cup match. Photo: Reuters

If you bit someone at work – as Uruguayan striker Luis Suárez appeared to on Tuesday night – would you get sacked? It seems likely. Read more

Emma Jacobs

So concludes a new research paper that used data collected from tests compiled by the Swedish military on men born between 1952 and 1978, who were entering compulsory military service. It then tracked these men’s income, education and service as CEO of any Swedish company – both public and private, small and large. The sample included 1.3m men of whom about 41,000 served as a chief executives.

The findings will add fire to the debate over high compensation for chief executives. Read more

Emma Jacobs

An artist's impression of the revamped bunks with en suite shower Photo: Transport Scotland/PA Wire

The revamp of the Caledonian Sleeper train service between Scotland and London looks like good news for the business travellers who account for half the traffic on that route.

Serco, the outsourcing group that has just snagged the franchise from FirstGroup, said more than £100m would be invested in new rolling stock that would come into service in 2018, with taxpayers footing much of the bill.

It already offers luxury sleeper services in Australia, including double beds at the very top end. The new Caledonian Sleeper carriages will feature berths for one or two travellers with an en suite toilet and shower, a safe, larger “hotel quality” towels and Shetland wool blankets (or duvets for the unpatriotic). Read more

Emma Jacobs

Private personal details: a luxury? Photo: Dreamstime

A little while ago I conversed with someone over email. He calls himself Alastair but I have no idea if that’s his real name. I doubt it. Read more

Emma Jacobs

One poor woman is performing a song at a social media conference. Wait for the chorus: “social”.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itvvFfeLh84#t=86 Read more

Emma Jacobs

Companies expanding overseas have made great efforts to counter past mistakes of corporate imperialism – rather than merely exporting home grown staff and products they make an effort to adapt to local culture and consumer tastes.

McDonalds, for example, offered vegetarian burgers and samosas in Gujarat, where most citizens are vegetarian. In New Delhi, it sold the Maharaja Mac with lamb and chicken for non-beef eaters. It also recruited local managers in New Delhi, which helped the company negotiate bureaucracy. Read more

Emma Jacobs

Marian Robinson with Barack and Malia Obama

Michelle Obama’s secret weapon for this week’s China trip has been unveiled: she is taking her mother Marian Robinson along, as well as her two daughters. Dubbed “grandma diplomacy“, it is seen as a way of charming the Chinese, who place greater emphasis on tight family bonds than their American counterparts. Read more

Emma Jacobs

Following the recent news that some investment banks had decided to make working conditions more palatable for junior employees, one former intern emailed the FT a poem he wrote last summer while completing a stint at a bank.

The Commute

On rings the cow bell,
Bringing cattle to their shed
Buy sell, buy sell
Work, work, work until you’re dead.

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Emma Jacobs

Steve Jobs has joined Lenovo. Well, almost.

Actually the truth is only a little less outlandish. Ashton Kutcher, the Hollywood star of Two and a Half Men, who recently played the Apple co-founder in the poorly-received biopic Jobs, is the Chinese computer group’s latest recruit: a product engineer. Read more

Emma Jacobs

A recent blog post in the Harvard Business Review raised the one of the most annoying and common problems of modern day office life: the “‘busy’ humble-brag”.

Everyone, just everyone, complains about how busy (or tired) they are at work. No one can even be plain busy – they are “slammed” or “buried”, writes Meredith Fineman, a publicist. Each employee, she says, is locked in a competitive battle of hyperbolic one-upmanship.

Ms Fineman’s favourite humble-brag (a brag because, of course, it also shows your importance) was “that of a potential client who apologized for lack of communication due to a ‘”week-long fire drill’. What does that even mean? Does this mean there were fake fires, but not real ones, all week? Does calling it a ‘drill’ mean that everything is okay? Is your business in flames? Should I call someone?” Read more

Emma Jacobs

The revelation that candidates for a job at Currys, the UK electronics retailer, were asked to dance as part of the interview process, recalls David Brent’s worst excesses. But at least the mythical manager in The Office chose to humiliate himself.

As 21-year-old graduate Alan Bacon told the BBC: Read more