Michael Skapinker

If ousted Danske Bank chief executive Eivind Kolding’s controversial advertising campaign persuaded any customers to take their accounts elsewhere, that is some achievement. Bank customers are reluctant to change banks regardless of what the advertising says.

I may be an extreme case – I have been with the same bank for 35 years – but international studies suggest I am not unusual. A worldwide survey last year by EY, the professional services firm, found that just a third of customers had ever changed their main bank.

Of course, Mr Kolding’s aim was to persuade customers to put their money in his bank rather than to take it out. The problem was that the Danske Bank ad (“A new normal demands news standards”), which featured, among other things, street rioters, Occupy campaigners and crumbling icebergs, was a category error. Read more

Michael Skapinker

Thomas Bach, the new president of the International Olympic Committee, is the ninth person to hold the position since it was established in 1894. The election of Mr Bach, once an Olympic gold medal fencer, comes shortly after the investiture of Ephraim Mirvis as chief rabbi of Britain and the Commonwealth. Britain has had chief rabbis since 1704. Rabbi Mirvis is just the 11th to hold the post.

When the Olympic movement and British Jewry appoint bosses, they expect them to stick around.

Contrast that with company chief executives, who are being thrown out in almost unprecedented numbers. Read more