Business

Emma Jacobs

In the 1970s you could buy a hippy-ish poster of a bird flying towards a lurid sunset, with the maxim: “If you love something, set it free: if it comes back to you, it’s yours; if it doesn’t, it was never meant to be.” I assumed the slogan had expired along with a taste for joss sticks and tie-dye T-shirts. I am amazed to find it has instead become a formal human resources policy.

Shortly after Philip Clarke made his surprising – and, it turns out, prescient –admission at a conference in March that his days as Tesco chief executive were probably numbered, the boss of another blue-chip British company asked me, worriedly: “Does it sometimes take two CEOs to turn a company round?”

The longest line at the Farnborough International Airshow this week was for a model aircraft. In the absence of the F-35 Lightning, the colossally expensive and accident-prone stealth fighter that was scheduled to be the show’s highlight before an engine failed on a test aircraft, Lockheed Martin brought a replica.

John Gapper

Rupert Murdoch is not exactly putting his money where his mouth is with 21st Century Fox’s unsolicited $80bn offer for Time Warner. By offering non-voting Fox shares as part of the cash-and-stock bid he has made clear that he will not risk his voting grip on his family-controlled company. Read more

Andrew Hill

Madeleine Albright, former US secretary of state, famously said there was “a special place in hell” for women who don’t help other women. But new research suggests that women leaders – and managers from ethnic minorities – will also be damned if they go out of their way to advance people who look like them.

A paper to be presented at next month’s Academy of Management annual meeting says women and non-white leaders who value diversity – and show it through their actions – are “systematically penalised with lower performance ratings” by their bosses. By contrast, valuing diversity earns white men higher ratings for both warmth and performance. The net effect, however, is that the “glass ceiling” is reinforced. Read more

John Gapper

It always pays to scrutinise the small print in grand pronouncements about the future, especially those about the BBC. So I listened intently this morning to Tony Hall, the BBC’s director general, as he set out his plans for more competition in UK television and radio production.

Lord Hall was at City University in London to explain the BBC’s offer to allow independent producers and commercial companies to produce more of its output, in return for letting the BBC’s production arm make programmes for others. Read more

Andrew Hill

The FCA: not to blame for social media caution (Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg)

Some British banks have a long way to go with social media. At a conference on Wednesday morning, one institution admitted its tweets were vetted by no fewer than eight different departments before they were sent.

The financial sector’s attitude to social media regulation seems to be a mix of fear and loathing. On a show of hands, only a couple of delegates at the Social Media Leadership Forum, where I was a speaker, revealed they were not scared about using social media, even though most believe it is a great opportunity. In part, this is because companies are waiting for guidance from the Financial Conduct Authority, first promised for early 2014, that the FCA says is now due later this summer. Even after this extended wait, the proposals will be subject to consultation before they are finalised. Meanwhile, other sectors’ social media strategies are evolving at web-speed. Read more