Media

Suddenly, after a prolonged drought, fresh money is pouring into US digital news. The strange thing is where it is going.

Andrew Hill

My first reaction to the latest news of changes at the top of the Murdoch empire was: did the shrink get involved?

Succession planning at family businesses is often full of unlikely twists and shrieking. After the phone-hacking scandal broke over Rupert Murdoch’s UK newspapers in 2011, Vanity Fair claimed that the Murdoch siblings had discussed succession with a “family counsellor”, partly in an attempt to smooth the process. Read more

Adam Jones

President Business, The Lego Movie's villain (AP)

Business schools love Lego. One Wharton professor co-wrote a tribute to the Danish toymaker, arguing that it “rewrote the rules of innovation”. But has this case study taken an anti-capitalist turn?

The baddie in The Lego Movie, out this month, is called President Business, prompting excitable Fox Business TV pundits to froth about the brand being used to brainwash kids against the profit motive. Rustbelt leftie Michael Moore tweeted his approval of the film, adding fuel to the fire.

However, having seen the film last weekend, I can assure any Ayn Rand-worshipping FT readers that it is not a threat. Read more

“News is what somebody does not want you to print. All the rest is advertising,” runs the journalists’ mantra, variously ascribed to publishers William Randolph Hearst and Lord Northcliffe. If so, news is being deluged.

Michael Skapinker

If ousted Danske Bank chief executive Eivind Kolding’s controversial advertising campaign persuaded any customers to take their accounts elsewhere, that is some achievement. Bank customers are reluctant to change banks regardless of what the advertising says.

I may be an extreme case – I have been with the same bank for 35 years – but international studies suggest I am not unusual. A worldwide survey last year by EY, the professional services firm, found that just a third of customers had ever changed their main bank.

Of course, Mr Kolding’s aim was to persuade customers to put their money in his bank rather than to take it out. The problem was that the Danske Bank ad (“A new normal demands news standards”), which featured, among other things, street rioters, Occupy campaigners and crumbling icebergs, was a category error. Read more

John Gapper

Tina Brown isn’t quite the power she once was in the New York media world but the famed editor is always worth watching for what she comes up with next. Her departure from The Daily Beast to run a live events company is no exception.

Barry Diller, founder of IAC, clearly lost patience with the ongoing losses at the Beast. It is reported by AdWeek to be on track to lose $12m this year, even after ditching Newsweek, which Ms Brown tried and failed to turn round.

But, never daunted, Ms Brown, a former editor of Tatler, the New Yorker and Vanity Fair magazines, is setting up Tina Brown Live Media. A sort of newfangled conference business it will, according her press release, produce “sponsor-supported summits, salons and flash debates”.

The first question is: what on earth is a “flash debate”? The best explanation so far was provided to Erik Wemple of the Washington Post. A “source close to Brown’s negotiations” told him: “’It’s bringing a group of people together in a quick time period doing topics of the day.’” Read more

Andrew Hill

 

It’s time to scotch the idea that because Twitter is a new medium, it requires companies to adopt entirely novel rules of behaviour for employees. The departure of Business Insider chief technology officer Pax Dickinson and the embarrassment of Ian Katz, BBC Newsnight editor, both as a result of inappropriate tweets, illustrate the point.

These men may have been using new-fangled tools, but they made old-fashioned errors of taste, judgment and behaviour, to which old-fashioned corporate codes of conduct should apply. Read more

So the revelation in FT Weekend’s interview with David Cornwell, better known as John Le Carré, that Mr Murdoch once lunched with the master espionage novelist is a delicious one. Mr Le Carré is no fan of the media mogul, telling one interviewer in 2010 (even before the phone hacking scandal engulfed News Corp) that his empire was guilty of “pretty horrendous manipulation of the media” and “enormous intrusions into our domestic affairs”.

But some years ago, he relates in the FT interview, he met the proprietor of The Times, after taking offence at one of the newspaper’s stories about him. Read more