Technology

Andrew Hill

Come dine with me: Quid's Gourley takes on SAP's Graf (right)

“I refuse to accept that small companies innovate and disrupt and large companies don’t, because that’s fundamentally wrong.”

That was the response of Peter Graf, Silicon Valley-based chief sustainability officer of SAP, to some sustained needling from Sean Gourley, co-founder of Quid, at a debate I chaired last week at the FT’s Innovate America conference on the Stanford campus. (The full video is here – things really start to kick off about eight minutes from the end). Read more

The internet and social network companies of Silicon Valley enjoy one of the world’s most attractive business models. Offer a free service, collect personal data, use it to lure advertisers, and expand seamlessly across the US and around the world to millions of users.

Andrew Hill

Photo: AFP/Getty

BlackBerry bosses’ thumbs must be getting tired. The company’s acting CEO John Chen has banged out another open letter to “valued enterprise customers and partners”, sprinkled with acronyms and suggesting a return to the group’s “heritage and roots” in “enterprise grade, end-to-end mobile solutions”. Read more

John Gapper

This undated handout photo released by A...This undated handout photo released by Amazon on December 1, 2013 shows an "octocopter" mini-drone that would be used to fly small packages to consumers. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos revealed on December 1 that his company was looking to the future with plans to use mini-drones to deliver small packages. AFP PHOTO / AMAZON  --- EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / AMAZON " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTSAMAZON/AFP/Getty Images

AFP/Amazon

Jeff Bezos’s plan to start delivering packages in the US by drone reminds me of a quote from The Everything Store, the Brad Stone book that recently won the FT and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year award: Read more

Andrew Hill

No one will ever find themselves in precisely the position Jeff Bezos found himself in when he launched Amazon.com in 1994, with the ambition to create an online “everything store”. Instead, most competitors will – at least for now – have to learn from Bezos’s success.

On Monday, The Everything Store, which traces Amazon’s rise, was named FT/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year for 2013, partly, in the words of one judge, because of its management lessons.

I talked to Brad Stone, the book’s author, about what those lessons might be, and he outlined four. Read more

Andrew Hill

Getty Images

A video about how IBM’s supercomputer Watson took on human contestants in the Jeopardy game show was playing in the lobby of the company HQ when I visited in September. Read more

Emma Jacobs

Steve Jobs has joined Lenovo. Well, almost.

Actually the truth is only a little less outlandish. Ashton Kutcher, the Hollywood star of Two and a Half Men, who recently played the Apple co-founder in the poorly-received biopic Jobs, is the Chinese computer group’s latest recruit: a product engineer. Read more

Ravi Mattu

Googlers: Vince Vaughn, left, and Owen Wilson in the film 'The Internship'

OK, this isn’t actually my question but one posted on Quora, the question-and-answer website. Helpfully, Sam Schillace offers an answer. And he ought to know: in 2006, he and his co-founders sold Upstartle, the maker of Writely, a word processor that worked in a web browser, to the technology company and it became the basis of Google Docs. Read more