Jeff Bezos

Inefficiency is not a quality usually associated with Amazon but Jeff Bezos’s company is behaving as if it is a small, disorganised bookstore that cannot quite control its stock. “You want that book, do you? Very sorry but we have run out. We can order you another copy but they are taking a long time to arrive at the moment. How about buying another title instead?”

John Gapper

This undated handout photo released by A...This undated handout photo released by Amazon on December 1, 2013 shows an "octocopter" mini-drone that would be used to fly small packages to consumers. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos revealed on December 1 that his company was looking to the future with plans to use mini-drones to deliver small packages. AFP PHOTO / AMAZON  --- EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / AMAZON " - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTSAMAZON/AFP/Getty Images

AFP/Amazon

Jeff Bezos’s plan to start delivering packages in the US by drone reminds me of a quote from The Everything Store, the Brad Stone book that recently won the FT and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year award: Read more

Andrew Hill

Inside Britain's 'everything store'. Photo: Bloomberg

A no-frills retailer offering a keenly priced range from AA batteries to Z-frame suitcases launches its own tablet device and prepares to expand its same-day click-and-collect service. Amazon? No, Argos, which was Britain’s “everything store” before Jeff Bezos reached high school. Read more

Andrew Hill

No one will ever find themselves in precisely the position Jeff Bezos found himself in when he launched Amazon.com in 1994, with the ambition to create an online “everything store”. Instead, most competitors will – at least for now – have to learn from Bezos’s success.

On Monday, The Everything Store, which traces Amazon’s rise, was named FT/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year for 2013, partly, in the words of one judge, because of its management lessons.

I talked to Brad Stone, the book’s author, about what those lessons might be, and he outlined four. Read more

Andrew Hill

Jeff Bezos is famously smart but I wonder whether he has thought through all the political implications of Amazon’s strategy of becoming back-office ecommerce infrastructure provider to the world.

The first part of FT colleague Barney Jopson’s series on the etailer was full of insight, but it was the comparison between Amazon and investment banks that struck me most forcefully. As Barney writes:

One investment banker says Amazon’s position is reminiscent of Goldman Sachs’ dual role as a broker and trader at the centre of capital markets. “People complain about conflicts of interest. But you still have to do business with them.”

Like Goldman and others, Amazon has set out to simplify the life of its clients, so they can concentrate on what they do best.  One business identified by the FT investigation – RJF Books and More – has delegated the “selling, shipping, customer service, payments and complaints” functions to Amazon, which left me wondering what else was left for RJF to do. Simplification was a strong theme of my recent trip to Silicon Valley, where countless start-ups, and a few larger businesses like NetSuite and Salesforce.com, are offering businesses the opportunity to “plug in” their operations to outsourced back-office services and payment systems. Read more

Andrew Hill

No question, for me, about the most interesting business story of the week: the launch in India of a $35 tablet computer called the Aakash (“sky” in Hindi). For perspective, go to the tablet department of Walmart.com, where $35 will buy you – just – a snap-on case for an iPad 2.

For anyone in doubt about the political significance of the announcement, Kapil Sibal, India’s education minister, rammed it home:

The rich have access to the digital world; the poor and ordinary have been excluded. Aakash will end that digital divide.

 Read more