Kindle

John Gapper

The difficulties of Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablet reminds me of how peculiar it was to hold a launch event at which no-one was allowed to try the device. With hindsight, I and others there should have taken that as a warning.

At the launch in New York in September, Amazon executives showed off the Fire and other Kindle models while journalists and others were kept at a safe distance. Outsiders were not given a chance to see how the devices performed for themselves. Read more

John Gapper

Amazon’s move to offer newspaper and magazine publishers 70 per cent of the revenues from selling their periodicals on Kindles is a testimony to the power of competition.

Amazon’s original terms were that it would take up to 70 per cent of the price itself, leaving publishers only 30 per cent. Since then, the launch of the iPad has given publishers an alternative – and one they are more excited about. Read more

John Gapper

Frédéric Filloux has a smart prediction on the Monday Note (a recommended weekly email about media and technology, by the way) about how the iPad and tablet computers could change the book business and help  longer-form journalism.

I have a couple of thoughts about it. Read more

John Gapper

Further to my column on the iPad, I’ve also been able  to make a comparison between Apple’s device and Amazon’s Kindle. The brief answer is: for periodicals such as digital papers and magazines, the iPod is better; for books, the Kindle still wins.

I’ve written before about the experience of reading papers such as the FT and the Wall Street Journal on a Kindle and have come across devoted readers – mainly senior executives in global companies – who are attached to reading the FT on their Kindles. Read more