management

Adam Jones

  © Henrik Sorensen/Getty

Remember those days when long-haul flights were sometimes only a half, or even a third full? The joy of sprawling out across four seats in economy for the original “flat bed” experience?

Airlines’ use of technology to manage their flights more efficiently has largely killed that 20th-century pleasure. I’ve struggled to count more than a handful of empty seats on most of the flights I’ve been on in recent years.

Now “big data” seems to be on the cusp of streamlining many other workplaces in a similar fashion — with consequences for workers that go far beyond a mere bad night’s sleep.

The latest edition of Harper’s magazine picks up on the growth of labour scheduling software in business, which, by matching shifts to demand more accurately, is helping to make sure businesses are not overstaffed. If only it stopped there. Read more

Emma Jacobs

LinkedIn's Reid Hoffman assesses levels of 'alpha-ness'. © Bloomberg

Everyone knows what an alpha personality is. Typically but not always a man, they dominate a group or workplace and are at the top of the pecking order, or ambitious to be so; they are assertive, often with a whiff of aggression. Read more

Andrew Hill

Drones are a useful tool for delivering flags to football pitches, as Albania’s supporters demonstrated on Tuesday night during their national team’s match against Serbia, but they remain an extreme option for same-day parcel delivery. Click-and-collect is the mundane but potentially disruptive approach favoured in the UK – an approach that Amazon, predictably, is about to take to the next level.

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Emma Jacobs

Sir Richard Branson’s “non-policy” on holidays is the latest attempt by a company to tackle the “work-life balance” conundrum. The news that he is allowing 170 staff in his head office to take holiday whenever they like, without seeking prior permission, so long as it does not damage the business has been greeted with great enthusiasm by commenters on his blog.

One summed up the Branson cheerleading: “As always, leading the way for Generation Y. I hope someday, before my time is done – that most can enjoy more freedom through work, not enslaved by hours and limits but set free to make a difference whilst living out some dreams. Good start to this movement Richard.” Read more

Emma Jacobs

Justin Timberlake, pop star and actor, is not typically seen as shedding light on societal divisions. Yet the character he played in a film, In Time, a few years ago, was on to something. Set in a dystopian future, where time is currency, the US has been split into “time zones” based on personal wealth. Timberlake’s character, Will Salas, handsome yet poor, tries to bring down the system.
A new study by the University of California, Berkeley, has found that although time is objectively identical for everyone, time perception is subjective. The authors’ key message is that the more powerful you are, the more time you feel you have. In fact, the authors write, “powerful individuals believe they have control over outcomes that they could not possibly control, such as the outcome of a die roll”.

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Adam Jones

Managers are notorious for prioritising short-term demands when they clash with long-term goals. Research in the US has shown that most executives would shy away from a value-enhancing long-term project if it caused them to miss a quarterly earnings forecast.

How companies can manage such clashes was the subject of a “Strategy Live” debate organised by the Financial Times in London this morning. Chaired by management editor Andrew Hill, the session featured senior figures from finance and industry, who spoke on a non-attributable basis under the Chatham House rule.

Participants used the example of Barclays to launch a broader debate, examining its controversial decision to increase bonuses to its investment bankers even as it – seemingly paradoxically – tried to move to a less abrasive, more long-termist cultureRead more