Daily Archives: May 5, 2011

Paul Ryan, chairman of the House Budget Committee, gave a talk and took questions this morning at an event organised by the American Council on Capital Formation. In his opening remarks he restated his basic, familiar position: the recovery is slower than it should be, and the country’s longer-term economic prospects are blighted, because of bad economic policy. Good economic policy, he said, means four things.

First, get government spending and deficits under control, to restore fiscal certainty and allay fears of higher taxes down the road. Second, tame the regulatory state. Third, increase tax revenues through higher growth. (Especially, stop putting US firms at a disadvantage with higher taxes than their international competitors face.) Fourth, ensure sound money. (He said he was worried about the scale of the Fed’s recent interventions and where they might lead. He drew from his wallet his portable collection of worthless hyperinflated currency from Zimbabwe, Weimar Germany, and other bankrupt nations, given to him by voters he has met.)

Then he was asked about the current talks over raising the debt ceiling.

Clive Crook’s blog

This blog is no longer updated but it remains open as an archive.

I have been the FT's Washington columnist since April 2007. I moved from Britain to the US in 2005 to write for the Atlantic Monthly and the National Journal after 20 years working at the Economist, most recently as deputy editor. I write mainly about the intersection of politics and economics.

Clive Crook’s blog: A guide

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