Monthly Archives: August 2014

Yesterday, in response to the sharing on the internet of horrific and sickening footage of the apparent execution of journalist James Foley, the UK’s Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) provided the following statement to news reporters:

The MPS Counter Terrorism Command (SO15) is investigating the contents of the video that was posted online in relation to the alleged murder of James Foley.

We would like to remind the public that viewing, downloading or disseminating extremist material within the UK may constitute an offence under terrorism legislation.

What was eye-catching about this statement was that “viewing” the material could, by itself, be a criminal offence under “terrorism legislation”. By the time the statement was issued, thousands of people had viewed the video. Was the MPS really saying that each UK viewer faced, at least in principle, a conviction under terrorism law for doing so? Read more

An ape takes a selfie: but who owns the copyright in the photograph?

This question is in the news because of a decision contained in the recent Wikimedia Foundation Transparency Report:

A photographer left his camera unattended in a national park in North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

A female crested black macaque monkey got ahold of the camera and took a series of pictures, including some self-portraits.

The pictures were featured in an online newspaper article and eventually posted to Commons.

We received a takedown request from the photographer, claiming that he owned the copyright to the photographs.

We didn’t agree, so we denied the request.

 Read more