Tag: Votorantim

A bias for action counts as a cardinal virtue in business. In turbulent markets, however, a bias for action can cause companies to chase every opportunity as if it were the chance of a lifetime or responding to every threat as if it could destroy the company. Frantic activity dissipates an organization’s war chest and focus and leaves it poorly positioned to seize golden opportunities when they do arise. (There are other risks to a bias for action, as I argued in an earlier post). Managers require discipline to say no to potential distractions to maintain reserves for golden opportunities and major crises when they arise.

When conducting research on Brazilian multinationals, I learned about the sport of spearfishing, which serves as a graphic metaphor to illustrate  the importance of disciplined opportunism. Spearfishermen dive underwater without oxygen tanks, armed only with a gun with a single spear. Once submerged, they surround themselves with kelp, which both attracts fish and hides the fisherman from his prey. Then he waits, motionless in the murky water, conserving oxygen and energy while waiting for the right fish to approach. A good fisherman can stay underwater for up to four minutes, and during this time needs the discipline to let the small fish swim by, while preserving his spear for the big prey, which can be as large as a person. At the right time, the fisherman shoots his spear with deadly accuracy. If he succeeds in spearing the fish, he must then reel it in and quickly kill it before surfacing with his catch.

Not a sport for the impatient or faint of heart, spearfishing provides a graphic metaphor to illustrate the process by which companies can effectively wait for, identify and seize opportunities in a turbulent market. The

To understand how companies thrive in turbulent markets, Martin Escobari and I studied ten Brazilian companies that thrived despite Brazil’s turbulence during the 1990s.  Brahma (brewing and beverages which through a series of acquisitions created Anheuser Busch InBev), Embraer (aircraft production), Votorantim (diversified conglomerate specializing in basic industries), Banco Itaú (banking), Natura (cosmetics), América Latina Logística (logistics), Promon (engineering), Sabó (auto parts), Pão de Açúcar (food retailing), and Aracruz (pulp and paper).

We paired each of the ten with a comparable firm that was less successful in managing turbulence. These paired companies provide a valuable contrast to our more successful firms. The similarities among the more successful companies, as well as the differences between them and their less successful peers, form the foundation for the findings in this book.

There are a few things to note about the companies we studied. First, they represent a broad cross-section of the economy. Most studies of management in turbulent environments have focused on U.S. information technology companies, primarily in the period between 1980 and 2000. By sampling across a variety of industries we hope to glean general insights about managing in unpredictability that would not emerge from a

Leading in turbulent times

This blog is no longer active but it remains open as an archive.

Don Sull is professor of management practice in strategic and international management, and faculty director of executive education at London Business School. This blog is dedicated to helping entrepreneurs, managers, and outside directors to lead more effectively in a turbulent world.

Over the past decade, Prof Sull has studied volatile industries including telecommunications, airlines, fast fashion, and information technology, as well as turbulent countries including Brazil and China, and found specific behaviours that consistently differentiate more, and less, successful firms. His conclusion is that actions, not an individual’s traits, increase the odds of success in turbulent markets, and these actions can be learned.

Don Sull’s blog: a guide

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Managing in an Unpredictable World
A series of video lectures by Professor Don Sull

Part 1: Fog of the future
Part 2: Future reconnaissance
Part 3: The strategic agility loop
Part 4: Executing with commitments
Part 5: Leading into the fog

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