Daily Archives: December 23, 2009

The only truly global power was in rapid relative decline. Not long before, it had won a pyrrhic victory in a costly colonial war. New great powers were on the rise. An arms race was under way, as was competition for markets and resources in undeveloped areas of the world. Yet people still believed in the durability of the free trade and free capital flows that had nurtured prosperity and, many believed, had also underpinned peace.

That was how the world looked to many at the end of the “noughties” of the 20th century. Yet catastrophe lay ahead: a world war; a communist revolution; a Great Depression; fascism; and then another world war. The world order – built on competing great powers, imperialism and liberal markets – proved incapable of providing the public goods of peace and prosperity. It took calamity, the cold war and the replacement of the UK by the US as hegemonic power to re-establish stability. That then facilitated decolonisation, unprecedented economic expansion, the collapse of communism and yet another epoch of market-led global integration. Read more

In this post for the Financial Times’ Economists’ Forum, Martin Wolf answers a reader’s question on deflation in western Europe and the US.  Read more

In this post for the Financial Times’ Economists’ Forum, Martin Wolf answers a reader’s question on deflation in asset prices. Read more

In this post for the Financial Times’ Economists’ Forum, Martin Wolf answers a reader’s question on the US Federal Reserve and quantitative easing. Read more