Monthly Archives: February 2011

FT Energy Source

- Oil groups prepare to shut down in Libya – FT

- Eni at risk as anti-Gaddafi unrest spreads – Bloomberg

- Oil surges as Libyan protests threaten supply – FT

- Goldman sees Brent at $110 – Bloomberg

- Are we witnessing the start of a new oil price shock? – The Telegraph

- BP in $7.2bn partnership with Reliance – FT

- Ambani may add assets after BP deal doubles Reliance cash – Bloomberg

- Exploration expertise found after long search – FT

- BP discovers new shores to conquer – The Times (£)

- BP eyes emerging markets but politics holds risks – FT

- Dudley targeting value over volume – FT Lex

- ‘Dirty’ energy in China and India – NY Times Green blog

- Russian energy czar warns BP – WSJ (£)

- BHP in $4.7bn US shale gas assets deal – FT

- BHP’s shale gas play reveals its weaknesses – WSJ (£)

- Dynegy management to leave as sale collapses – FT

- Shell sells African businesses for $1bn – FT

- Tar sands row threatens Canada-EU trade deal – Reuters

- Battle over oil in Congo national park – FT

- UN sets out blueprint for green growth – The Guardian

- GOP: The dirty energy party – NY Times

- Wood Group eyes industry spending boost – FT

As the Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya comes crashing down, despite regime attempts to butcher demonstrators — here’s a timely reminder on corporate exposure.

Much of it, as you’d expect, is concentrated in oil production. (Output at the country’s Nafoora oil field had stopped on Monday due to strikes, incidentally.)

In one of the biggest foreign direct investments to date in India, BP is to pay $7.2bn to Reliance Industries in a deal that will give it a 30 per cent stake in 23 oil and gas blocks.

The blocks together cover approximately 270,000 sq km, the companies said in a statement on Monday, making the partnership “India’s largest private sector holder of exploration acreage”. BP and Reliance will also form a 50:50 joint venture for the sourcing and marketing of gas.

Kiran Stacey

BP’s partnership with Rosneft was remarkable for a number of reasons, not least that it was done against the wishes of BP’s partners in TNK-BP and was the first equity partnership between a private international and a public national oil company. It is also a partnership not limited to developing Russian assets only: the two parties have a 50/50 ownership of Ruhr Oel, a German refining joint venture.

Ian Smale, BP’s group head of strategy and policy, told an audience in London on Monday that the two companies would be looking at further JVs outside Russia, and described the arrangement as an example of how IOCs and NOCs could form closer partnerships in future.

Kiran Stacey

Protests in LibyaAs protests move from the east of Libya towards its capital Tripoli, triggering the decision by BP to suspend some of its operations in the country, markets are nervously watching the oil price.

According to David Fyfe, the International Energy Agency’s head of oil industry and markets division, around 50,000 barrels per day of crude production have been shut in because of the anti-Gaddafi protests and the regime’s response to them.

Brent Crude chartSo concerned is the IEA that Fyfe felt the need to remind delegates at International Petroleum week, which started in London today, that his organisation was sitting on 1.6bn barrels of publicly-held crude stocks, which it could tap if supplies were seriously interrupted.

FT Energy Source

- BP Statoil suspend Libya operations – WSJ (£)

- BP prepares to evacuate some Libya staff – AFP

- BP suspends oil exploration in Libya as violence worsens – Bloomberg

- Crude up on Libya unrest – WSJ (£)

- Oil flows, but high prices jangle nerves – NY Times

- Oil groups rush to grab slice of East Africa – FT

- European gas pipeline costs double – The Guardian

- TNK-BP considers role in Rosneft tie-up – FT

- Judge puts off Chevron decision – WSJ (£)

Centrica risks probe with £2bn bonanza – FT

- Centrica has ‘nothing to hide’ from profits inquiry – The Telegraph

- France to discuss nuclear industry fate – Reuters

- Cameron intervenes in Cairn sale – FT

- Essar agrees break fee on Shell’s Stanlow – FT

- DCC ignores OFT and buys rival Pace – The Telegraph

- Energees takes control of Regal Petroleum – FT

Kiran Stacey

“Greg Barker has been rude and unprofessional.” This was the assessment of the UK’s energy minister by John Moreton, chairman of MO3, a UK solar power company.

He and the industry were furious when Barker outlined his objections to large solar farms taking government subsidies, saying:

Speculators and hot money should find another home for their investments. We want to see an ambitious roll out of solar panels on Britain’s roof space but not all over the countryside.

In response, the solar industry is now gearing up for a fight against the government’s planned review of solar feed-in tariffs.

Organised* by the Renewable Energy Association, more than 20 companies have gathered together to take on the government. They aim to gather a warchest of £200,000 and use every method at their disposal – trade bodies, lawyers and PR people.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Alexander Medvedev, deputy chief executive of Gazprom, answers your questions.

In this second post, he answers questions on support from Vladimir Putin, the likelihood of a deal between South Stream and Nabucco and future Russian gas demand.

Earlier, he discussed changes to gas pricing, how reliable a partner his company is for EU countries and how Gazprom will respond to the shale gas boom.

Next in the hotseat are Terry Duffy and Craig Donohue, chairman and chief executive of the CME Group. They will be answering your oil-price related questions next Friday, February 25th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 20th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Alexander:

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Alexander Medvedev, deputy chief executive of Gazprom, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses changes to gas pricing, how reliable a partner his company is for EU countries and how Gazprom will respond to the shale gas boom.

In the second post, published later, he will answer questions on support from Vladimir Putin, the likelihood of a deal between South Stream and Nabucco and future Russian gas demand.

Next in the hotseat are Terry Duffy and Craig Donohue, chairman and chief executive of the CME Group. They will be answering your oil-price related questions next Friday, February 25th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 20th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Alexander:

Kiran Stacey

Alexander Medvedev, deputy CEO of Gazprom, has been laying out his thoughts on the US shale boom, which threatens to knock his company off its pedestal as the dominant player in the natural gas market.

He likened the shale boom to the internet bubble, “which first blew up enormously and then flattened itself out to some rational and logical size”.

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