Daily Archives: April 22, 2011

Sheila McNulty

A year after the Macondo disaster, the industry has pulled together in the US and built not one, but two spill containment systems. These systems are really state-of-the-art and aimed at containing a massive spill in the deep water.

The first one, the Containment Response System, cost $1bn and is designed to be trucked to anywhere along the Gulf of Mexico, loaded onto a vessel, shipped out to a drill site and dispatched under water to contain oil spilling from a runaway well.

The system, complete with capture vessels, was developed by ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell, Chevron and ConocoPhillips. It took several months to build and testing has shown it can operate in 8,000 feet of water, capturing 60,000 barrels of fluid per day at pressures of 15,000 pounds per square inch. A more comprehensive system, which can operate in 10,000 feet of water, and capture 100,000 barrels of fluid a day, will be available by the middle of next year.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Cameron O’Reilly (far left) and Steve Cunningham  answer your questions. They are CEO and UK and Ireland chief, respectively, of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest maker of smart meters by market share.

In this second of two posts, they talk about how manufacturers and grid operators can work together on rolling out meters and how big the global market for the devices could be.

Earlier, they discussed what can be done with the data from smart meters, and how concerned the public should be about the use of this data.

Now, over to Cameron and Steve:

Kiran Stacey

Cameron O'ReillySteve CunninghamIn this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Cameron O’Reilly (far left) and Steve Cunningham  answer your questions. They are CEO and UK and Ireland chief, respectively, of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest maker of smart meters by market share.

In the first of two posts, they discuss what can be done with the data from smart meters, and how concerned the public should be about the use of this data.

In the second post, published later on Friday, they talk about how manufacturers and grid operators can work together on rolling out meters and how big the global market for the devices could be.

Now, over to Cameron and Steve:

Kiran Stacey

Rolling out intelligent energy meters could help the UK reduce its energy usage by up to 15 per cent, five times current government estimates, the world’s biggest smart meter maker has said.

Answering Energy Source readers’ questions, Cameron O’Reilly and Steve Cunningham, the CEO and UK and Ireland chief (respectively) of Landis+Gyr, said the UK was being too pessimistic in their forecast for how much impact smart meters could make.

They said:

Even if the immediate benefit seen by home owners is the 2-3 per cent saving that the UK government’s model assumes, it is still a profoundly valuable exercise.

But we seriously doubt that those conservative savings will be the best that the UK achieves. Landis+Gyr’s experience is that deployments which have focused on encouraging energy budgeting have delivered usage reductions of 10-15 per cent, even when they have had far less sophisticated capabilities than those planned here. Our energy retailers are some of the most innovative in the world – it would be a surprise if, in partnership with their customers, they couldn’t at least match those figures.

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