Emissions

Kiran Stacey

Ever wondered exactly how the various layers of UK and EU energy legislation might affect your business? Well here, thanks to engineering company Arup, is the answer. The energy specialists there have put together this handy timeline for how and when regulations are due to come into force. Read more

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, answers your questions.
In this second post, he tackles renewable heat, biofuels and carbon regulation. Read more

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses how discredited the European emissions trading scheme is and what the jump in oil prices means for renewables.

In the second post, published later, he will tackle renewable heat, biofuels and carbon regulation.

Next in the hotseat is Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of the environmental film Gasland. He will be answering your questions next Friday, February 11th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 6th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to James: Read more

Kiran Stacey

James Cameron, one of the key advocates for carbon trading, has leapt to the defence of the beleaguered European emissions trading scheme, insisting, “We have no option but to make this work.” Read more

Sheila McNulty

As Congress fights over whether or not to block the US Environmental Protection Agency from regulating carbon emissions, 23 states are moving ahead on one level or another to take climate legislation into their own hands and institute cap-and-trade schemes at the local level.

California’s is by far the most comprehensive state system being instituted, and cap-and-trade is to begin in the state in 2012. Indeed, Mary Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, the regulator responsible for implementing cap-and-trade, calls it the “capstone of our climate policy”.

But it is not the first state system to move on cap-and-trade. Read more

Kiran Stacey

[Solar panels wind turbine] Banks will have to supply 2 per cent of Europe’s GDP, or €2.9 trillion, to meet consumer demand for projects and technologies that tackle climate change, according to a new report from Barclays and Accenture. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Good news from the UK’s energy department today. Greenhouse gas emissions fell in 2009 by 8.7 per cent, according to the final official government figures. Read more

Sheila McNulty

ExxonMobil has made some interesting – if not surprising – forecasts in its annual Outlook for Energy, in which it projects long-term energy trends. The report is not just what Exxon hopes will happen but rather based on detailed analysis of 100 countries, 15 demand sectors and 20 fuel types. Read more

Sheila McNulty

The US Environmental Protection Agency unleashed a backlash against ethanol when it waived a limitation on selling gasoline that contains more than 10 per cent ethanol for cars with model years from 2001 through 2006.  Read more

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Magued Eldaief, the head of GE’s UK energy business, answers your questions.
In the first of two posts, he discusses the future for nuclear power in northern Europe, wind power in the developing world and whether it is better to back small- or large-scale power generation projects. Read more