Emissions

Kiran Stacey

Ever wondered exactly how the various layers of UK and EU energy legislation might affect your business? Well here, thanks to engineering company Arup, is the answer.

The energy specialists there have put together this handy timeline for how and when regulations are due to come into force.

So if you’ve ever wondered when the renewables obligation is due to end, or how much return on investment to expect from the feed-in tariff, this is the place to look.

I will also put a permanent link to the chart on the right hand side of this site.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, answers your questions.

In this second post, he tackles renewable heat, biofuels and carbon regulation.

Earlier, he discussed how discredited the European emissions trading scheme is and what the jump in oil prices means for renewables.

Next in the hotseat is Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of the environmental film Gasland. He will be answering your questions next Friday, February 11th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 6th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to James:

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses how discredited the European emissions trading scheme is and what the jump in oil prices means for renewables.

In the second post, published later, he will tackle renewable heat, biofuels and carbon regulation.

Next in the hotseat is Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of the environmental film Gasland. He will be answering your questions next Friday, February 11th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 6th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to James:

Kiran Stacey

James Cameron, one of the key advocates for carbon trading, has leapt to the defence of the beleaguered European emissions trading scheme, insisting, “We have no option but to make this work.”

The scheme has come under heavy criticism after the discovery of €30m worth of theft, which led to the suspension of the emissions trading market – at least until today. But Cameron, answering Energy Source readers’ questions, said such breaches were inevitable.

He said:

If there was no value, the thieves wouldn’t be interested. All markets contain the potential for abuse and sharp practice. If there was one in motherhood and apple pie someone would take advantage.

Sheila McNulty

As Congress fights over whether or not to block the US Environmental Protection Agency from regulating carbon emissions, 23 states are moving ahead on one level or another to take climate legislation into their own hands and institute cap-and-trade schemes at the local level.

California’s is by far the most comprehensive state system being instituted, and cap-and-trade is to begin in the state in 2012. Indeed, Mary Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, the regulator responsible for implementing cap-and-trade, calls it the “capstone of our climate policy”.

But it is not the first state system to move on cap-and-trade.

Kiran Stacey

Banks will have to supply 2 per cent of Europe’s GDP, or €2.9 trillion, to meet consumer demand for projects and technologies that tackle climate change, according to a new report from Barclays and Accenture.

The report took what it calculated to be the likely level of demand for things such as wind farms, energy efficiency measures and electric vehicles and estimated how much capital would be needed to fund these.

In a way, this looks like good news: demand is likely to be so high that it could provide a real opportunity for the banks. Rupesh Madlani, head of European renewables and cleantech equity research, told Energy Source: “There is a lot for the banks to play for here.”

Kiran Stacey

Good news from the UK’s energy department today. Greenhouse gas emissions fell by 8.7 per cent in 2009, according to final official figures.

The FT reports:

The UK’s greenhouse gas emissions dropped 8.7 per cent in 2009 as the recession took its toll on fuel and electricity consumption across the economy.

Sheila McNulty

ExxonMobil has made some interesting – if not surprising – forecasts in its annual Outlook for Energy, in which it projects long-term energy trends. The report is not just what Exxon hopes will happen but rather based on detailed analysis of 100 countries, 15 demand sectors and 20 fuel types.

It says energy demand in developing nations will rise more than 70 per cent through 2030 even as energy efficiency measures keep demand flat in the developed world. So, combining the developing and developed world, overall global energy demand will rise 35 per cent from 2005 levels.

Sheila McNulty

The US Environmental Protection Agency unleashed a backlash against ethanol when it waived a limitation on selling gasoline that contains more than 10 per cent ethanol for cars with model years from 2001 through 2006.

The agency had been studying the impact of fuel that contains up to 15 per cent ethanol, known as E15, on older passenger vehicles (including cars, SUVs and light pickup trucks) after already approving its use in newer vehicles.  It announced Friday that testing showed that E15 does not harm emissions control equipment. From Lisa Jackson, EPA administrator:

Whenever sound science and the law support steps to allow more home-grown fuels in America’s vehicles, this administration takes those steps.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Magued Eldaief, the head of GE’s UK energy business, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses the future for nuclear power in northern Europe, wind power in the developing world and whether it is better to back small- or large-scale power generation projects.

In the second post, he discusses subsidies for carbon capture and storage, legislation to curb emissions and the future of smart metering.

Next in the hotseat is Iam Simm, chief executive of Impax Asset Management. He will be answering your questions next Friday, January 28th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, January 23rd to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Magued:

Energy Source is no longer updated but it remains open as an archive.

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