Energy

Pakistan is being urged to cut its energy subsidies in order to resolve supply problems that have led to chronic electricity shortages. But the debate on reducing energy spending touches upon a more fundamental failing of the Pakistani state: a near total inability to get the population to pay either tax or energy bills.

Theoretically, maintaining artificially low prices for electricity should see the proportion of paid bills rise. But PEPCO, the national power company, has seen collected revenue fall over the past year.

Thank you for your readership and comments during Energy Source’s run.

The energy team has decided to concentrate on its stories for the main ft.com site, as well as its weekly podcast, and this blog will publish its final entry on Friday, August 5. The site will no longer be updated after that date but it will remain available as an archive.

Please continue to follow the FT’s energy coverage via www.ft.com/energy

You can reach Sylvia Pfeifer, energy editor, at sylvia.pfeifer@ft.com

Libyan oil production will take years, not months, to return to full capacity once a political solution to the conflict is found, according to Barclays Capital.

“The reincorporation of Libyan oil into the world market increasingly seems a distant possibility” according to the study, which warns of a lasting political vacuum after the potential fall of the Gaddafi regime.

BP, solar, De Beers, Centrica

In this week’s podcast: Interim results from BP fail to please investors; solar power – how economic is it? We ask CEO of Canadian Solar, Dr Shawn Qu; diamond company De Beers gets a new chief executive; and, Centrica – what should we expect from its results?

Presented by Sylvia Pfeifer with Vincent Boland, Pilita Clark, William MacNamara and David Blair.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

Energy subsidies in Pakistan are contributing to “severe supply problems” according to a report from the country’s Petroleum Institute.

Power consumption has grown by 80% over the last 15 years, but a failure to keep up with demand has led to crippling electricity shortfalls.

Uganda is planning to build only the second oil refinery in East Africa by 2015.

Following the recent discovery of 2.5 billion barrels of oil, Uganda aims to develop a refinery in Hoima, according to Fred Kabagame Kaliisa, permanent secretary at the energy ministry.

Turkmenistan has started to sell gas to China through the world’s longest natural gas pipeline as it continues to develop an international export market for its vast energy reserves.

Israel may be considering its energy options after a pipeline bringing gas from Egypt suffered four attacks in the space of five months.

This link provides Israel with 40 per cent of its gas and the most recent explosion, which took place at a monitoring station near the Egyptian town of Al-Arish, was the second incident in as many weeks.

Chevron, the US energy company, will carry out oil exploration off the Liberian coast later this year, giving the west African country the possible chance to join its neighbours as an oil-producing nation.

A device that uses the odour of smelly feet to trap mosquitoes is to get a boost in funding in the fight against malaria.

Scientists have known for some time that human odour attracts mosquitoes, but researchers from Tanzania’s Ifakara Health Institute have found that the smell of human feet can attract four times as many mosquitoes as ordinary human scent.

Energy Source is no longer updated but it remains open as an archive.

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