Readers’ Q&A

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Cameron O’Reilly (far left) and Steve Cunningham  answer your questions. They are CEO and UK and Ireland chief, respectively, of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest maker of smart meters by market share.

In this second of two posts, they talk about how manufacturers and grid operators can work together on rolling out meters and how big the global market for the devices could be.

Earlier, they discussed what can be done with the data from smart meters, and how concerned the public should be about the use of this data.

Now, over to Cameron and Steve:

Kiran Stacey

Cameron O'ReillySteve CunninghamIn this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Cameron O’Reilly (far left) and Steve Cunningham  answer your questions. They are CEO and UK and Ireland chief, respectively, of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest maker of smart meters by market share.

In the first of two posts, they discuss what can be done with the data from smart meters, and how concerned the public should be about the use of this data.

In the second post, published later on Friday, they talk about how manufacturers and grid operators can work together on rolling out meters and how big the global market for the devices could be.

Now, over to Cameron and Steve:

Kiran Stacey

Rolling out intelligent energy meters could help the UK reduce its energy usage by up to 15 per cent, five times current government estimates, the world’s biggest smart meter maker has said.

Answering Energy Source readers’ questions, Cameron O’Reilly and Steve Cunningham, the CEO and UK and Ireland chief (respectively) of Landis+Gyr, said the UK was being too pessimistic in their forecast for how much impact smart meters could make.

They said:

Even if the immediate benefit seen by home owners is the 2-3 per cent saving that the UK government’s model assumes, it is still a profoundly valuable exercise.

But we seriously doubt that those conservative savings will be the best that the UK achieves. Landis+Gyr’s experience is that deployments which have focused on encouraging energy budgeting have delivered usage reductions of 10-15 per cent, even when they have had far less sophisticated capabilities than those planned here. Our energy retailers are some of the most innovative in the world – it would be a surprise if, in partnership with their customers, they couldn’t at least match those figures.

Kiran Stacey

Steve CunninghamCameron O'ReillyI am pleased to say that Cameron O’Reilly (right), chief executive of Landis+Gyr, has joined Steve Cunningham (left), the company’s UK & Ireland CEO, in the hotseat for next week’s readers’ Q&A.

The two are at the very top of the world’s biggest smart meter maker by market share. This is your chance to ask them about anything from how quickly it might be able to install 1m meters for British Gas, to the future of smart meters and grids worldwide, to the company’s plans for a flotation or sale.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by Sunday, April 17th.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Michael Bromwich, director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, answers your questions.

In this second post, he discusses the reliability of blowout preventers (BOPs), the future of drilling in Alaska, and whether commercial concerns dictate his decision making.

Earlier, he talked about how his organisation balances safety concerns with political ones, what technological improvements have been made since the BP oil spill and whether new regulations on BOPs will delay the issue of new permits.

Next week, Steve Cunningham, chief executive of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest smart meter maker, will be in the hotseat. Email your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Sunday, April 17th.

But for now, over to Michael:

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Michael Bromwich, director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses how his organisation balances safety concerns with political ones, what technological improvements have been made since the BP oil spill and whether new regulations on blowout preventers (BOPs) will delay the issue of new permits.

In the second post, published above, he talks about the reliability of BOPs in general, the future of drilling in Alaska, and whether commercial concerns dictate his decision making.

Next week, Steve Cunningham, chief executive of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest smart meter maker, will be in the hotseat. Email your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Sunday, April 17th.

But for now, over to Michael:

Kiran Stacey

Deepwater Horizon explosionThe chief regulator of US offshore oil drilling has dismissed warnings from the industry about the risk to oil output from delays in issuing new permits.

Reacting to warnings that a two-year delay could put at risk up to 680,000 barrels of oil equivalent a day by 2019, Michael Bromwich, director of the US ocean energy regulator, pointed out that no output had so far been lost. He also insisted he would not be swayed either by companies or politicians when making permitting decisions.

Kiran Stacey

Many thanks for all your questions for Michael Bromwich, the man in charge of offshore oil permitting in the US. His answers will appear on this site on Friday, April 15th.

Next week, the person in the hotseat will be Steve Cunningham, UK and Ireland chief executive of Landis+Gyr, the world’s biggest maker of smart meters.

This is your chance to ask Steve about anything from how quickly it might be able to install 1m meters for British Gas, to the future of smart meters and grids worldwide, to his company’s plans for a flotation or sale.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by Monday, April 11th.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Amrita Sen, oil analyst at Barclays Capital, answers your questions.

In this second of two posts, she discusses drilling in the US, national oil subsidies and growing demand from the Middle East.

Earlier, she answered questions on whether speculation is driving up the oil price, whether such an increase could trigger another recession and when “peak oil” might occur.

(NB – Because of a very high volume of questions, we were not able to tackle every question submitted. Apologies if yours was not answered.)

Next week, Michael Bromwich, director of the US oceans regulator, will be answering your offshore-drilling queries. Email questions to energy.source@ft.com by the end of Sunday, April 10th.

But for now, over to Amrita:

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Amrita Sen, oil analyst at Barclays Capital, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, she discusses whether speculation is driving up the oil price, whether such an increase could trigger another recession and when “peak oil” might occur.

Later, she will discuss drilling in the US, national oil subsidies and growing demand from the Middle East.

(NB – Because of a very high volume of questions, we were not able to tackle every question submitted. Apologies if yours was not answered.)

Next week, Michael Bromwich, director of the US oceans regulator, will be answering your offshore-drilling queries. Email questions to energy.source@ft.com by the end of Sunday, April 10th.

But for now, over to Amrita:

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