Renewables

BP, solar, De Beers, Centrica

In this week’s podcast: Interim results from BP fail to please investors; solar power – how economic is it? We ask CEO of Canadian Solar, Dr Shawn Qu; diamond company De Beers gets a new chief executive; and, Centrica – what should we expect from its results?

Presented by Sylvia Pfeifer with Vincent Boland, Pilita Clark, William MacNamara and David Blair.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

UK electricity reform, Australian carbon pricing, Macarthur Coal

In this week’s podcast: We talk to former speaker of the California state assembly and founder of G24 Innovations, Bob Hertzberg, about the UK’s white paper on reforming the electricity market; we look at Australian prime minister, Julia Gillard’s announcement on carbon pricing; and, we discuss the possible takeover of mining company Macarthur Coal by US-based Peabody Energy.

Presented by David Blair with Pilita Clark and William MacNamara.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

Developing countries invested more in renewable energy than their developed counterparts for the first time last year, according to a report commissioned by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).

Middle East nuclear, RWE, Chinese wind turbines

In this week’s podcast: We talk to Deloitte’s head of nuclear, Daniel Grosvenor about nuclear power plans in the Middle East; we look at German utility RWE and the possible sale of UK subsidiary Npower; and, we discuss China’s steps into the European wind market with the country’s biggest turbine maker securing an Irish wind farm deal worth €1.5bn.

Presented by David Blair with Pilita Clark and Vincent Boland.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

Sheila McNulty

Alaska’s decision to host the largest oil and gas lease sale of any US state this year is good news for the oil and gas industry, which has been pressing for more access. And while the resulting exploration and production certainly will be good for the overall economy – creating jobs and boosting activity – it is a pity that it is not against a backdrop of better news on the environmental front.

By this I mean concerted steps by the US government to reduce the use of oil as part of a larger effort to curtail carbon emissions. This issue has long disappeared from the political radar, despite being a key platform on which President Barack Obama was elected.

BP, EU emissions, India

In this week’s podcast: BP looks to settle potential claims over the Gulf spill; global airlines prepare to be included in EU emission targets; and we talk to Sangram Nayaka, organiser of the Energy Investment Summit in Dehli about India’s energy policy – nuclear vs renewables?

Presented by Sylvia Pfeifer with Pilita Clark and Vincent Boland in the studio in London, and Andrew Charlton from Aviation Advocacy in Geneva.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

Among the hardscrabble nations of Central America, renewable energy involves no high-falutin’ principles. It is an essential weapon in a battle for survival as well as a hope for prosperity in some of the frailest economies of the Americas.

Central America has no oil, save for a few thousand barrels a year from Guatemala. It has no coal, nor any natural gas. With the region’s annual oil import bill running at more than $7bn a year and rising, volatility in world oil markets competes with the notorious vulnerability of the region to natural disasters as a major threat to economic stability.

Hence, the quest for renewable energy resources is drawing some 600 representatives of businesses, governments, aid agencies and NGOs to a “Clean Energy Summit” in Guatemala on Monday and Tuesday.

Kiran Stacey

Just as private equity houses are found to be ramping up their interest in the oil and gas sector, they are at the same time backing out of green energy and cleantech, worried about the possibility of a green bubble forming.

A survey by Rothstein Kass showed 24 per cent of more than 200 PE fund managers highlighting the green sector as the most likely to produce the next investment bubble.

Kiran Stacey

Chris HuhneI speculated this month somewhat idly on whether the UK or US energy secretary would be the first to quit his post. Many in the gossipy world of Westminster politics are betting on an imminent departure of Chris Huhne. But after one of the stormiest weekends of his political life, it is difficult to say whether he is now stronger or weaker.

The story that might yet kill Huhne’s political career, at least in the short term, is entirely non energy-related. Police are considering whether to investigate claims that he asked another person to take driving penalty points on his behalf for a speeding offence. He denies any wrongdoing.

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