Tag: Biofuels

By Iona Teixeira Stevens in São Paulo

Sir John Beddington, chief scientific adviser to the UK government, might not have realised it but his visit to Brazil this week came at a crucial time for the Brazilian ethanol market.

At a conference on climate change, Sir John reminded those present that “Brazil is the largest producer of research in agricultural science … and is the world leader in bio energy”. Ethanol accounts for about half the non-diesel fuels market in Brazil.

But recently, Brazil’s ethanol market has been struggling due to a delayed sugarcane harvest, forcing it to import a significant amount of biofuel from the US. With ethanol prices rising, it has raised questions once again about the viability of biofuels in a world that increasingly needs to till land for food.

FT Energy Source

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Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, answers your questions.

In this second post, he tackles renewable heat, biofuels and carbon regulation.

Earlier, he discussed how discredited the European emissions trading scheme is and what the jump in oil prices means for renewables.

Next in the hotseat is Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of the environmental film Gasland. He will be answering your questions next Friday, February 11th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 6th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to James:

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Ian Simm, chief executive of Impax Asset Management, answers your questions.

Below, he discusses impediments to biofuels, EU support for Chinese renewables and gas’ future as a clean energy source.

Next in the hotseat is James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital. He will be answering your questions next Friday, February 4th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, January 30th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Ian:

Sheila McNulty

The US Environmental Protection Agency unleashed a backlash against ethanol when it waived a limitation on selling gasoline that contains more than 10 per cent ethanol for cars with model years from 2001 through 2006.

The agency had been studying the impact of fuel that contains up to 15 per cent ethanol, known as E15, on older passenger vehicles (including cars, SUVs and light pickup trucks) after already approving its use in newer vehicles.  It announced Friday that testing showed that E15 does not harm emissions control equipment. From Lisa Jackson, EPA administrator:

Whenever sound science and the law support steps to allow more home-grown fuels in America’s vehicles, this administration takes those steps.

Kiran Stacey

Peter Voser

Image by Shell

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Peter Voser, the chief executive of Shell, answers your questions.

In the second of two posts, he discusses the future of natural gas, the controversial process of “fracking” and why biofuels are the answer to powering transport.

Next in the hotseat is Chris Huhne, the UK energy secretary, who will be answering your questions on electricity market reform next Thursday, December 23rd. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of today – Friday, December 17th – to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Peter:

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