Tag: Carbon price

Kiran Stacey

Many thanks for all your questions for Ian Simm, chief executive of Impax Asset Management. His answers will appear on this site on Friday, January 28th.

Next week, the person in the hotseat will be James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, the investment manager specialising in carbon markets and clean tech companies.

Cameron is also one of the green industry’s most high-profile advocates, and this is your chance to ask him about everything from the carbon price to the success of the Cancun climate talks. He will have just returned from Davos, so can give an insider’s view on all the wheeling, dealing and gossip that happened there.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Sunday, January 30th.

Kiran Stacey

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

In the first of a new series of readers’ Q&A sessions, Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of energy policy and regulation, tackles the burning questions you wanted answering. Eon is Germany’s biggest power company and is heavily involved in the UK market.

In the second part of the session, Sara discusses the obstacles to building new nuclear plants, how the UK measures up on low-carbon technology and the limitations of a carbon floor price.

Next in the hotseat is Ditlev Engel, chief executive of Vestas, the world’s biggest manufacturer of wind turbines. Send in your questions by the end of Friday, November 26th for consideration, to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Sara:

Kiran Stacey

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

In the first of a new series of readers’ Q&A sessions, Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of energy policy and regulation, tackles the burning questions you wanted answering. Eon is Germany’s largest energy company and is heavily involved in the UK market.

In the first of two parts, Sara talks about why the changes to the carbon reduction commitment could be a good thing, how to reform the energy market and the future of carbon capture and storage.

In the second part, to be published later this morning, she will discuss the obstacles to building new nuclear plants, how the UK measures up on low-carbon technology and the limitations of a carbon floor price.

Next in the hotseat is Ditlev Engel, chief executive of Vestas, the world’s biggest manufacturer of wind turbines. Send in your questions by the end of Friday, November 26th for consideration, to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Sara:

Kiran Stacey

Starting next week, Energy Source is bringing back its reader Q&A sessions. This is a chance for you to ask the bigwigs of the energy industry anything you could possibly want.

Sara Vaughan -- image by Eon

First up in the hotseat is Eon’s Sara Vaughan, their UK director of regulation and energy policy.

Eon is of course Germany’s biggest energy company, but it has a very high profile in the UK. Sara will be answering all your questions, from why it decided not to press ahead with Kingsnorth, to what is the future of UK nuclear power, to what carbon price is needed to stimulate green energy growth.

Send all your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Friday 19th November.

Kiran Stacey

After my earlier pessimistic post (at least it was for green campaigners and those in low-carbon energy production) on the hopes of setting a high and stable carbon price, there is a very different message in a report from The Climate Institute in Australia.

It claims that the UK leads the field in incentivising low-carbon technologies, and that the government’s policies have led to an implied carbon price of $28 per tonne.

If so, that is higher than the €15 a tonne at which carbon is currently trading, but nowhere near the €80 and €90 the industry says is needed.

I won’t repeat the report in full, but this graphic is very interesting:

Kiran Stacey

Last week I wrote that one of the areas of complete agreement at a debate during the European Future Energy Forum had been the need for a high and stable carbon price to incentivise low carbon energy production. But I added that nobody knew how to bring it about.

During that debate, the foreign office minister Lord Howell said:

The government has got to keep its nerve and do some brave things which are highly unpopular and likely to lose nice votes. This is getting if anything more difficult, as gas gets very cheap, and the gap with renewables widens. We need to get costs down and carbon price up.

This resolution to make a potentially unpopular move will be tested on Wednesday evening. That is when the big six British energy companies, including Centrica, EDF and Scottish Power, will warn Chris Huhne over dinner that the government’s proposed carbon floor price is not going to achieve much.

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