Tag: Carbon reduction commitment

Kiran Stacey

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

In the first of a new series of readers’ Q&A sessions, Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of energy policy and regulation, tackles the burning questions you wanted answering. Eon is Germany’s largest energy company and is heavily involved in the UK market.

In the first of two parts, Sara talks about why the changes to the carbon reduction commitment could be a good thing, how to reform the energy market and the future of carbon capture and storage.

In the second part, to be published later this morning, she will discuss the obstacles to building new nuclear plants, how the UK measures up on low-carbon technology and the limitations of a carbon floor price.

Next in the hotseat is Ditlev Engel, chief executive of Vestas, the world’s biggest manufacturer of wind turbines. Send in your questions by the end of Friday, November 26th for consideration, to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Sara:

Kiran Stacey

Here at the CBI’s climate change summit, most of the anger towards government has centred on the changes to the carbon reduction commitment (CRC), which has seen money originally earmarked for businesses with good environmental performances going to the Treasury instead. The BBC’s Roger Harrabin summed up the feeling in the room when he described it as the government “nicking your CRC dividend”.

So business leaders are relieved to hear Chris Huhne, the energy secretary, make some concessions today. Here’s what he said:

Today we have published a UK-wide consultation on delaying the start of Phase II of CRC. This means that participants won’t need to register for Phase II until 2013.

Kiran Stacey

The director general of the CBI, the British business lobby group, has been outlining this morning his vision of where exactly the UK business sector is in terms of meeting its climate change commitments.

Speaking at the CBI’s climate change summit in London, Lambert made a fairly downbeat assessment of what has been achieved over the past three years. And he had two simple messages for UK policymakers: be consistent and stop hyping ‘green’ jobs.

The second of these messages comes as something of a surprise from a spokesman for British industry, which has been told to expect a major boom from the creation of jobs related to tackling climate change.

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