DECC

Kiran Stacey

I speculated earlier this month somewhat idly on whether the UK or US energy secretary would be the first to quit his post. Many in the gossipy world of Westminster politics are betting on an imminent Chris Huhne departure. But after one of the stormiest weekends of his political life, it is difficult to say whether he is now stronger or weaker. Read more

Kiran Stacey

The UK has decided to put forward 12 projects for consideration by the European Investment Bank for its New Entrants Reserve, the €4.5bn pot to spend on CCS and “innovative renewable projects”. Read more

Kiran Stacey

The UK government has a big decision to make next week: whether to endorse the proposals by the Committee on Climate Change to set stringent emissions reductions targets for 2030. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Marine energy turbinesThe numbers from today’s report by the Carbon Trust into the potential of marine energy are impressive. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Rolling out intelligent energy meters could help the UK reduce its energy usage by up to 15 per cent, five times current government estimates, the world’s biggest smart meter maker has said. Read more

Kiran Stacey

The group of UK solar companies behind the campaign against the reduction of the feed-in tariff for larger projects has asked the courts to quash the government’s review altogether. Read more

Kiran Stacey

George Osborne reiterated today the UK government’s “determination to be the greenest government ever”. But given what we already knew, most of the new information contained in Wednesday’s Budget is set firmly against that agenda. Read more

Kiran Stacey

David Cameron may regret saying he wanted the coalition to be the “greenest government ever”. Not because he didn’t mean it, but because as ministers strive to keep to the tough spending allowances granted by the Treasury, it is an aim that seems to be slipping further and further away. Read more

David Blair

The government points out that its proposed reduction in feed-in tariffs for large solar arrays will not apply retrospectively. Only new entrants after August 1 this year will be affected by the plans.
But it can take 12–18 months to set up a big solar power scheme.  Read more

Kiran Stacey

Greg Barker, the UK energy minister, has completed his review of subsidies for solar power under the feed-in-tariff scheme, and, as expected, he has reduced the amount of money available for installations that provide over 50kW. Read more