Electricity market reform

Kiran Stacey

I speculated earlier this month somewhat idly on whether the UK or US energy secretary would be the first to quit his post. Many in the gossipy world of Westminster politics are betting on an imminent Chris Huhne departure. But after one of the stormiest weekends of his political life, it is difficult to say whether he is now stronger or weaker. Read more

Sheila McNulty

While the lack of a coherent national energy policy is nothing new for the US, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services says in a new report that Washington’s current inability to definitively establish long-lasting energy policies and regulations distinguishes today’s situation from earlier eras. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Another day, another complaint about the carbon floor price. This controversial policy has united an unlikely alliance of green campaigners and heavy industry in opposition.  Read more

Kiran Stacey

As reported in the FT on Monday, green campaigners in the UK have stepped up their attack on the carbon floor price, calling it a “windfall” for the nuclear industry. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Many apologies to all of those who sent in questions, but we are having to delay Chris Huhne’s Q&A session until the new year, as the energy secretary has not yet been able to answer all your questions. Read more

Kiran Stacey

[huhne1] Two days ago, before Chris Huhne announced his package of measures to shake up the UK electricty market, a group of energy industry insiders and experts told Energy Source what they wanted to see from the reforms. Now that we know the details, and people have had time to figure out what they mean, the question remains, did they get what they wanted? Read more

[huhne1] Chris Huhne this morning criticised a Telegraph headline – suggesting bills would rise by £500 because of his energy reforms – as “ludicrous” and “absolutely bonkers”. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Chris Huhne, the UK energy secretary, will tomorrow announce the details and scope of the government’s consultation on electricity market reform (EMR). The bill will come before parliament in the spring, but tomorrow’s announcement is expected to give some indications of the direction of government thought on certain key issues.
Huhne will be answering your EMR-related questions on this blog next week – email energysource@ft.com by Friday, December 17th to pose your question. Meanwhile, here is what the energy industry wants to see ahead of the tomorrow’s release. Read more

Kiran Stacey

[huhne] Many thanks for all your questions for Peter Voser, Shell’s chief executive. His answers will appear on this site on Friday, December 17th.
Next week, the person in the hotseat will be Chris Huhne, the UK energy secretary. The government will shortly begin consultations on how it should reform the electricity market. This is your chance to ask him about anything electricity-related: from whether and how the UK can reach its emissions and renewables targets, to the role of nuclear power and whether it can thrive without government subsidy, to how customers can get the fairest deal possible.
 Read more

Kiran Stacey

In the first of a new series of readers’ Q&A sessions, Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of energy policy and regulation, took on the burning questions you wanted answering. Below are her thoughts on how the UK measures up on low-carbon energy, the limitations of a carbon floor price and why the carbon reduction commitment might be better off as a tax. Read more