Feed-in tariff

Kiran Stacey

The group of UK solar companies behind the campaign against the reduction of the feed-in tariff for larger projects has asked the courts to quash the government’s review altogether. Read more

Kiran Stacey

As Italy becomes the latest European government to consider changing its solar subsidies, ministers should pay attention to today’s report into green investment from the Pew Environment Group. Read more

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Francesco Starace, chief executive of Enel Green Power, answers your questions. Read more

David Blair

The government points out that its proposed reduction in feed-in tariffs for large solar arrays will not apply retrospectively. Only new entrants after August 1 this year will be affected by the plans.
But it can take 12–18 months to set up a big solar power scheme.  Read more

Kiran Stacey

Greg Barker, the UK energy minister, has completed his review of subsidies for solar power under the feed-in-tariff scheme, and, as expected, he has reduced the amount of money available for installations that provide over 50kW. Read more

Kiran Stacey

The UK government’s plan to review the scope of its feed-in tariff looks sensible. The scheme is there to stimulate small-scale solar energy production, the reasoning goes, so we should stop large corporations from soaking up subsidies meant for householders with panels on their roofs.
But the review is in danger of giving the renewables industry and its investors very mixed messages. Read more

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Magued Eldaief, the head of GE’s UK energy business, answers your questions.
In the first of two posts, he discusses the future for nuclear power in northern Europe, wind power in the developing world and whether it is better to back small- or large-scale power generation projects. Read more

Kiran Stacey

The UK energy secretary has promised to ensure that industrial-scale solar farms do not swallow up too much of the money dedicated to incentivising small-scale renewables projects. Read more

Kiran Stacey

[huhne1] Two days ago, before Chris Huhne announced his package of measures to shake up the UK electricty market, a group of energy industry insiders and experts told Energy Source what they wanted to see from the reforms. Now that we know the details, and people have had time to figure out what they mean, the question remains, did they get what they wanted? Read more

Kiran Stacey

Chris Huhne, the UK energy secretary, will tomorrow announce the details and scope of the government’s consultation on electricity market reform (EMR). The bill will come before parliament in the spring, but tomorrow’s announcement is expected to give some indications of the direction of government thought on certain key issues.
Huhne will be answering your EMR-related questions on this blog next week – email energysource@ft.com by Friday, December 17th to pose your question. Meanwhile, here is what the energy industry wants to see ahead of the tomorrow’s release. Read more