Tag: Gazprom

Dmitry Medvedev, Russian president, touring Mognitogorsk metal works March 2011President Dmitry Medvedev has grumbled more than once about ministers holding top jobs at state-controlled companies – and to little effect. But this time it seems to be for real.

After Medvedev late on Wednesday ordered the removal of ministers from state enterprise boards by mid-year, Arkady Dvorkovich, his economic aide, followed up on Thursday and named names, starting with Igor Sechin, deputy prime minister, and Alexei Kudrin, finance minister. This is serious – and Moscow is rife with speculation about what it all means.

As the Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya comes crashing down, despite regime attempts to butcher demonstrators — here’s a timely reminder on corporate exposure.

Much of it, as you’d expect, is concentrated in oil production. (Output at the country’s Nafoora oil field had stopped on Monday due to strikes, incidentally.)

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Alexander Medvedev, deputy chief executive of Gazprom, answers your questions.

In this second post, he answers questions on support from Vladimir Putin, the likelihood of a deal between South Stream and Nabucco and future Russian gas demand.

Earlier, he discussed changes to gas pricing, how reliable a partner his company is for EU countries and how Gazprom will respond to the shale gas boom.

Next in the hotseat are Terry Duffy and Craig Donohue, chairman and chief executive of the CME Group. They will be answering your oil-price related questions next Friday, February 25th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 20th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Alexander:

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Alexander Medvedev, deputy chief executive of Gazprom, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses changes to gas pricing, how reliable a partner his company is for EU countries and how Gazprom will respond to the shale gas boom.

In the second post, published later, he will answer questions on support from Vladimir Putin, the likelihood of a deal between South Stream and Nabucco and future Russian gas demand.

Next in the hotseat are Terry Duffy and Craig Donohue, chairman and chief executive of the CME Group. They will be answering your oil-price related questions next Friday, February 25th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 20th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Alexander:

Kiran Stacey

Alexander Medvedev, deputy CEO of Gazprom, has been laying out his thoughts on the US shale boom, which threatens to knock his company off its pedestal as the dominant player in the natural gas market.

He likened the shale boom to the internet bubble, “which first blew up enormously and then flattened itself out to some rational and logical size”.

Kiran Stacey

Many apologies to our readers, especially those who sent in questions, but we have had to cancel the planned question and answer session with Josh Fox due to a misunderstanding over publication terms and conditions.

Sorry to all of those who expected to see answers to their questions, but keep watching this blog for the session with Gazprom’s Alexander Medvedev, to be published here on Friday.

And in the meantime, go and see Josh’s film Gasland, before it wins an Oscar and everyone wants a ticket.

Kiran Stacey

Many thanks for all your questions for Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of Gasland. His answers will appear on this site on Friday, February 11th.

Next week, the person in the hotseat will be Alexander Medvedev, deputy chief executive of Gazprom and head of Gazprom’s exports.

This is your chance to ask one of the biggest names in the gas world anything: from how his company can counter the US shale gas boom; to how much pressure he is under to lower prices for foreign governments; to what are the chances and potential consequences of another gas dispute with Ukraine.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Sunday, February 13th.

Kiran Stacey

Earlier this month, Eon announced its plans to raise €15bn over three years to pay off debt and fund an expansionary drive outside Europe.

At the time, Johannes Teyssen, the chief executive (pictured), wrote to shareholders:

Our objective is to sharpen Eon’s profile as an international energy specialist and to increase our earnings strength by placing it on a broader, more international foundation.

Just three weeks into that three-year period, the company has already made its first move, selling its 3.5 per cent stake in Gazprom for €3.4bn. Teyssen said today:

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