Tag: Sara Vaughan

Kiran Stacey

Earlier this month, Eon announced its plans to raise €15bn over three years to pay off debt and fund an expansionary drive outside Europe.

At the time, Johannes Teyssen, the chief executive (pictured), wrote to shareholders:

Our objective is to sharpen Eon’s profile as an international energy specialist and to increase our earnings strength by placing it on a broader, more international foundation.

Just three weeks into that three-year period, the company has already made its first move, selling its 3.5 per cent stake in Gazprom for €3.4bn. Teyssen said today:

Kiran Stacey

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

In the first of a new series of readers’ Q&A sessions, Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of energy policy and regulation, tackles the burning questions you wanted answering. Eon is Germany’s biggest power company and is heavily involved in the UK market.

In the second part of the session, Sara discusses the obstacles to building new nuclear plants, how the UK measures up on low-carbon technology and the limitations of a carbon floor price.

Next in the hotseat is Ditlev Engel, chief executive of Vestas, the world’s biggest manufacturer of wind turbines. Send in your questions by the end of Friday, November 26th for consideration, to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Sara:

Kiran Stacey

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

Sara Vaughan, image by Eon

In the first of a new series of readers’ Q&A sessions, Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of energy policy and regulation, tackles the burning questions you wanted answering. Eon is Germany’s largest energy company and is heavily involved in the UK market.

In the first of two parts, Sara talks about why the changes to the carbon reduction commitment could be a good thing, how to reform the energy market and the future of carbon capture and storage.

In the second part, to be published later this morning, she will discuss the obstacles to building new nuclear plants, how the UK measures up on low-carbon technology and the limitations of a carbon floor price.

Next in the hotseat is Ditlev Engel, chief executive of Vestas, the world’s biggest manufacturer of wind turbines. Send in your questions by the end of Friday, November 26th for consideration, to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Sara:

Kiran Stacey

This morning, Ofgem announced it would probe pricing by the big six UK energy companies, amid concerns that profit margins are soaring, with the customer losing out.

Today, the head of UK energy policy at one of those big six, Eon, has urged the company’s rivals to change their business models entirely. Answering Energy Source readers’ questions (posed before the Ofgem investigation was announced), Sara Vaughan said:

Energy companies are going to have to change. Traditionally, energy was all about building big central power stations and working out how best to get that power into people’s homes through a one-way transmission and distribution system.

While those centralised power stations are still going to be part of the future, it’s also clear that things are going to change substantially, with more emphasis placed on relationships with customers, who can take responsibility for their own energy usage for the first time.

Kiran Stacey

Ditlev Engel - Photo courtesy of Vestas

Ditlev Engel - Photo courtesy of Vestas

Many thanks for all your questions for Sara Vaughan, Eon UK’s head of regulation and energy policy. Her answers will appear on this site on Friday.

Next week, the executive facing a grilling by Energy Source readers will be Ditlev Engel, chief executive of Vestas, the world’s biggest maker of wind turbines.

This is your chance to ask Engel about Vestas’ role in building Thanet, the world’s largest offshore wind farm, or perhaps about why the company is cutting 3,000 jobs when governments across Europe are stating their commitment to wind power.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by this Friday, November 26th.

Kiran Stacey

Starting next week, Energy Source is bringing back its reader Q&A sessions. This is a chance for you to ask the bigwigs of the energy industry anything you could possibly want.

Sara Vaughan -- image by Eon

First up in the hotseat is Eon’s Sara Vaughan, their UK director of regulation and energy policy.

Eon is of course Germany’s biggest energy company, but it has a very high profile in the UK. Sara will be answering all your questions, from why it decided not to press ahead with Kingsnorth, to what is the future of UK nuclear power, to what carbon price is needed to stimulate green energy growth.

Send all your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Friday 19th November.

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