Tag: Shale gas

Kiran Stacey

Many thanks for all your questions for Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of Gasland. His answers will appear on this site on Friday, February 11th.

Next week, the person in the hotseat will be Alexander Medvedev, deputy chief executive of Gazprom and head of Gazprom’s exports.

This is your chance to ask one of the biggest names in the gas world anything: from how his company can counter the US shale gas boom; to how much pressure he is under to lower prices for foreign governments; to what are the chances and potential consequences of another gas dispute with Ukraine.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Sunday, February 13th.

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital, answers your questions.

In this second post, he tackles renewable heat, biofuels and carbon regulation.

Earlier, he discussed how discredited the European emissions trading scheme is and what the jump in oil prices means for renewables.

Next in the hotseat is Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of the environmental film Gasland. He will be answering your questions next Friday, February 11th. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, February 6th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to James:

Kiran Stacey

Many thanks for all your questions for James Cameron, vice chairman of Climate Change Capital. His answers will appear on this site on Friday, February 4th.

Next week, the person in the hotseat will be Josh Fox, the Oscar-nominated director of the film the entire natural gas world is talking about: Gasland.

This is your chance to ask Josh all about his experience of making a movie about shale gas; from what resistance he had to overcome from gas companies when making the film, to the truth behind the famous tap-on-fire sequences, to what governments are likely to do to regulate fracking in future.

Email all your questions to energysource@ft.com by the end of Sunday, February 6th.

Kiran Stacey

Gasland, the environmental documentary about the effects of shale gas extraction, has been nominated for a “best documentary” Oscar.

The makers are, of course, buzzing, but, predictably, gas campaigners are livid. This is the rather cuting response from Energy In Depth, the lobbying group, which has mounted something of a campaign against the film:

While it’s unfortunate there isn’t an Oscar category for propaganda, this nomination is fitting, as the Oscars are aimed at praising pure entertainment among Hollywood’s elite.

Ouch. If you have any questions arising from the film, or if there’s anything you would like to ask about shale gas or fracking, watch out for our Energy Source readers’ Q&A with Josh Fox, coming up on February 11th. I’ll advertise it fully nearer the time.

Sheila McNulty

A group of US investors have filed shareholder resolutions with nine oil and gas companies, pressing them to disclose plans for managing risks associated with the technology being used to extract gas from shale rock.

With the US Environmental Protection Agency investigating the risks; a New York State moratorium on use of the technology; and cases like the one being built against Range Resources in Texas, the resolutions are no surprise.

Kiran Stacey

Last night, Gasland, the film that has stoked an intense debate about the ethics of the shale gas boom in the US, premiered here in the UK.

It couldn’t have been better timed – Cuadrilla is due to begin more drilling at its shale gas site near Blackpool later this month. And the Tyndall Centre, in conjunction with the Co-op, helped get the debate moving on this side of the Atlantic with a report calling for a halt to all such drilling while the risk is properly assessed.

But what of the film itself?

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Jack Gerard, head of the API, the voice of the US oil industry, answers your questions.

In the first of two posts, he discusses the importance of energy efficiency, why drilling curbs should be eased and where the world will find new sources of oil.

In the second post, published above, he discusses peak oil, the potential of natural gas, and what the API’s lobbying achieves.

Next in the hotseat is Magued Eldaief, the head of GE’s UK energy business. He ill be answering your questions next Friday, January 21st. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of Sunday, January 16th to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Jack:

Kiran Stacey

A hat tip to Nick Grealy of No Hot Air for spotting this one. On Wednesday, the energy minister Greg Barker gave an intriguing glimpse of the UK attitude towards fracking, the gas extraction method that has caused so much controversy in the US. And it’s good news for the gas companies.

Here is the full exchange:

Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his policy is on the use of hydraulic fracturing by the oil and gas industry; and what discussions he has had with his EU counterparts on regulation of the use of hydraulic fracturing.

Gregory Barker: Hydraulic fracturing has long been used to increase the productivity of oil and gas fields and, more recently, of shale gas reservoirs, where the rock has low natural permeability. The Department has no objection to the use of this technique so long as all of the relevant environmental and planning assessments have been carried out and permissions granted. I have had no discussions with my EU counterparts on the regulation of the use of hydraulic fracturing.

Kiran Stacey

Peter Voser

Image by Shell

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Peter Voser, the chief executive of Shell, answers your questions.

In the second of two posts, he discusses the future of natural gas, the controversial process of “fracking” and why biofuels are the answer to powering transport.

Next in the hotseat is Chris Huhne, the UK energy secretary, who will be answering your questions on electricity market reform next Thursday, December 23rd. Send in your questions for consideration by the end of today – Friday, December 17th – to energysource@ft.com.

But for now, over to Peter:

Sheila McNulty

In a sign of how controversial shale drilling has become, key Republican members of Congress are questioning the Obama administration’s moves to regulate the technology that has made the US gas boom possible.

US Rep Joe Barton and the man who beat him to the chairmanship of the House energy committee, Fred Upton (picutred), are pressing Ken Salazar, the interior secretary, for information related to the agency’s plans for new regulations on hydraulic fracturing.

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