Shell

Kiran Stacey

Shell has produced a lengthy update to its Shell Scenarios today, laying out what the company believes will be the themes affecting the energy industry until 2050. Read more

Oil prices jumped above $103 a barrel for Brent crude on Thursday amid the latest violent clashes in Egypt between pro-democracy protestors and supporters of embattled president Hosni Mubarak. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Will the glut of natural gas be a good thing for the environment? The gas industry insists it could be, if we invest in the infrastructure to use it, as it would displace coal, which produces more CO2 when burned.  Read more

Sylvia Pfeifer

Shares in BP hit a 6-month high this morning after a report that Shell considered an opportunistic takeover bid for the UK oil group in the summer during the Gulf of Mexico spill.  Read more

Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Peter Voser, the chief executive of Shell, answers your questions.
In the second of two posts, he discusses the future of natural gas, the controversial process of “fracking” and why biofuels are the answer to powering transport.
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Kiran Stacey

In this week’s readers’ Q&A session, Peter Voser, the chief executive of Shell, answers your questions. Read more

Kiran Stacey

The BP oil spill has harmed the reputation of the entire oil industry, the chief executive of Shell, BP’s closest rival, has said. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Many thanks for all your questions for Yvo de Boer, former head of the UN climate change department and current advisor to KPMG. His answers will appear on this site on Friday.
Next week, the person in the hotseat will be Peter Voser, the boss of one of the world’s biggest oil companies, Shell. This is your chance to ask him anything you want, from the controversy surrounding oil sands, to why Shell wants to move from oil to gas, to the prospects for drilling in the Gulf following the BP spill. Read more

Kiran Stacey

Yesterday Desire Petroleum’s shares jumped more than a quarter, which can only mean one thing: oil in the Falklands. Read more

Sheila McNulty

The majors have a history of selling what they believe are their “cast offs” to the small, independent oil and gas producers because they see little value in them. When they all left the US for global markets, writing the US off as “mature” back in the 1970s, the independents picked up the pieces and carried on.  Read more