Hedge funds miss out on Greece

While hedge funds are the focus of attacks on “speculators” from Greek, French, German, Spanish and Portuguese politicians for allegedly trashing the euro and Greek bonds, the funds don’t seem to have made money from it.

According to Hedge Fund Research, which tracks the industry, so-called “macro” hedge funds – those trading interest rates, currencies and government debt around the world – have lost money this year, suggesting they were betting the wrong way on Greece, lost big money elsewhere or had ignored the Greek trade altogether (although there are exceptions – at least one was coining it at the start of the crisis, while others deliberately closed their trades because they expected a political fracas).

But Bloomberg reports on a lovely irony: at least one of those betting against Greek bonds using the dreaded CDS was an American mutual fund. Fully regulated, respectable, and run by one of America’s oldest fund managers. The mission of Eaton Vance, according to founder Charles Eaton:

Professional investment management entails an obligation of responsibility of the highest order. It is a very serious matter to accept the obligation to be responsible for the investment of anybody’s money.

The eurocrats currently planning to ban the use of “naked” CDS to make such bets – a bad move with worse motivation – must be choking into their cappuccinos. They’ll be even more annoyed when they realise that a ban in Europe will have no impact at all if the US continues its opposition to such a move and allows CDS to be used not just to protect existing bond holdings, as Europe wants, but also to speculate.

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Christopher Cook is an FT editorial writer. Before joining the FT in 2008 as a Peter Martin Fellow, he worked for three years for the Conservative party.

Lorien Kite is deputy comment editor, a post he took up in 2009 after four years as a commissioning editor on the analysis page. He joined the FT in 2000.

Ian Holdsworth became assistant features editor in 2009 and was previously chief production journalist for the features pages.


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