The Short View

James Mackintosh

As the market rally falters (perhaps), John Authers and I have a new home on FT Alphaville.

This blog will no longer be updated, but our occasional thoughts and more frequent output will appear at ftalphaville.ft.com. Bookmark it and check back! Read more

James Mackintosh

The Bank of England has finally snapped. It is fed up with being constantly criticised for messing up its forward guidance on interest rates, and this week began what looks like a co-ordinated campaign to hit back.

Three of its policymakers have made speeches so far defending the policy, and their key points are simple. Here’s what they said, then some charts. Read more

John Authers

Lehman has, at last, been bankrupt for five years. I posted the last of the five-video series we put together for the anniversary here. This post is for those hardy few who have still not had enough of Lehman memorabilia. If you have the time and inclination, try looking through some of these videos, which I made at the time (when I was based in New York and still covered the Short View).

First, this video, which we produced for what we then considered to be the first anniversary of the crisis, in August 2008 a few weeks before Lehman, bears re-watching. The key message to be derived from it is that claims that nobody saw the Lehman bankruptcy coming, or the crisis that surrounded it, do not hold water. It features today’s interviewee, the former Olympic fencer James Melcher, and his comments are particularly prescient: Read more

James Mackintosh

Americans have been wondering if the housing market is in a double bubble for a little while, since Professor Robert Shiller, co-creator of the Case-Shiller house price indices, raised the danger.

The real action has been in housebuilders, though. Their valuations, based on price to estimated book value, peaked in May above where they stood at the height of the property bubble in 2005/6. Prices look very much like the rebound bubble in the Nasdaq, in the Dow Jones Industrials in the late 1930s and in the Nikkei 225 (although it wasn’t quite so big). This chart shows the Nasdaq and Nikkei time-shifted so the peaks overlap with the 2005 peak in housebuilding shares:

Housebuilders, Nasdaq and Nikkei

I’ve circled the point where the rebound went wrong again: seven to eight years later for both Nasdaq and, less spectacularly, the Nikkei (the Dow’s second depression-era boom-bust came in 1937, also eight years after the original bubble).

More fab charts, including one must-see on why US housing isn’t as affordable as everyone thinks, after the break. Read more

James Mackintosh

Spandau Ballet’s 1983 anthem Gold could be the national anthem for the world’s inflationistas.

Always believe in your soul
You’ve got the power to know
You’re indestructible
Always believe in, because you are
Gold! GOLD Read more

Stephen Foley, the FT’s markets correspondent, says a number of forces have combined to sour the outlook for the precious metal, and none of them seem likely to abate any time soon.

A suggestion by Dutch finance minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem that the Cyprus deal could mean depositors at troubled banks elsewhere in the eurozone also suffering has pushed banks back into bear territory. James Mackintosh, investment editor, warns of the risk of a vicious downward spiral unless Europe and the European Central Bank can reflate peripheral economies.

The S&P 500 is gnawing at an all-time high. Bond proxy stocks are driving the rally and James Mackintosh, investment editor, warns that as companies opt for share buy-backs rather than reinvesting, future profits and investors will be the poorer.

James Mackintosh

Among phrases you don’t hear any much any more are:

  • Safe as houses
  • As sound as a pound
  • As safe as the Bank of England.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that all three are out of fashion, after the US housing bubble that brought down the world economy, the collapse of sterling and the Bank of England’s failure to control inflation over either the past 50 years or the more recent past, when it was aiming for 2 per cent (the blue line on the chart).

UK CPI inflation and the target

Yesterday’s UK Budget avoided the extra inflationary pressure that would have come from fiddling with the target, which should give some support for the pound. But don’t get too positive: outgoing governor Sir Mervyn King voted for a second time for more monetary easing, and while he was outvoted again, Mark Carney is widely expected to be both more dovish and more convincing. I discuss this in today’s Short View column and video, and in greater detail below:

 Read more

The European Central Bank – like the Bank of England – has decided against an immediate further loosening of monetary policy, but Mario Draghi, president, says some ECB policymakers favour cutting interest rates. Ralph Atkins, the FT’s capital markets editor, argues that with small businesses in the eurozone’s south facing a severe credit crunch and the stronger euro hitting eurozone exports, further action from the ECB may soon prove inevitable.