James Mackintosh

Old stock market wisdom has it that as goes January, so goes the year. As with “sell in May”, “run your winners” and so many others, there is some truth in the saying: in 62 of the last 85 years the US market has moved the same direction in January as in the full year ahead.

On the other hand, the first day of trade is irrelevant, as Howard Silverblatt at S&P Dow Jones Indices points out. 

James Mackintosh

When the European Central Bank governing council meets on Thursday in Frankfurt, sushi is unlikely to be on the menu. But officials should have a concern: is the eurozone turning Japanese?

This chart shows headline inflation (in Japan the measure excludes fresh food) for Japan since its bubble turned to bust in 1990, heralding a slide into deflation. Radical action by its central bank is just beginning to return price rises, as the far right hand side shows. 

James Mackintosh

As the festive season approaches investors will be preparing for the boring but essential job of selling some of their wonderfully-performing US shares to rebalance their portfolios back into underperforming bonds, protecting some of those gains.

The question investors face is whether such diversification will help protect their portfolios in the future. 

James Mackintosh

How much is a £20 coin worth? The Royal Mint seems to have created a risk-free arbitrage, thanks to its decision to sell the first silver £20 coin for £20, with free postage (hat tip to Elroy Dimson). It is legal tender, so there’s no risk of it being worth less than £20 (and it could always be paid into a bank account or swapped at the Bank of England if you feared it might be).

Yet, on ebay demand is such that the coins are selling for £30 or more – and some chancers are listing the coins for as much as £65, plus postage. Presumably these prices are being paid by collectors attracted by scarcity value. It certainly has nothing to do with the intrinsic value, as the silver content of the coins is worth only about £6.33. 

James Mackintosh


Bear

Source: www.geekphilosopher.com

Where are all the bears? Even some of the usual suspects have stopped growling, with David Rosenberg of Gluskin Sheff going so far as to dispute the idea that he’s a permabear. There are a few still carrying the flame – Russell Napier, the stock market historian, thinks the S&P 500 will fall to 500 – but with the S&P now at 1,772 there are few willing to listen to the growls. 

James Mackintosh

Money has been piling into European shares as fears of the euro imploding recede, the economy shows signs of life and investors look for the next trade after Japan.

But the “eurozone shares are cheap” theme might have run its course. This chart shows the discount of eurozone forward price-to-earnings compared to the US, as a percentage (using MSCI indices). 

James Mackintosh

FT Alphaville today has a nice chart suggesting London house prices are down by more than a quarter in real terms.

Here’s an alternative thought: the quality of measurement of London house prices has collapsed. This chart shows London house prices after inflation as measured by LSL/Acadametrics, the Office for National Statistics, Nationwide, and the Halifax index Alphaville used. I used CPI, rather than the discredited RPI, for most of them, but showed the effects of both RPI and CPI for the Acadametrics series.

London housing indices

Halifax down at the bottom there is clearly out of line with the rest, although Nationwide’s index still shows a hefty real terms loss, of 9 per cent. 

John Authers

At first, the idea that the Nobel economics prize should be shared between Eugene Fama and Robert Shiller sounds absurd – akin to making Keynes and Friedman share the award.

Gene Fama, of the University of Chicago, is famous as the father of the Efficient Markets Hypothesis, after all, while Yale’s Bob Shiller is famous primarily for being the principal critic of that hypothesis. 

James Mackintosh

Investors have used all sorts of valuation models in the past 20 years. Which to use for Twitter, now that it is preparing to float?

Here’s another handy measure: price per worker. Twitter is more than its staff, of course. But it’s a useful sanity check on any valuation. The higher the value, the more investors have to assume there’s something really special about their assets – factories (a carmaker), intellectual property (think cure for cancer), innovative culture (Apple?), near-monopoly position (once Microsoft, now Google).