The world’s population is changing in ways that could barely be imagined a generation ago, and at a pace that is faster than any in recorded history. Not only are we all living longer, but in the richest countries – and in many newly middle class nations – people are having too few babies to keep population stable. By 2050, according to UN projections, those aged over 65 will outnumber children aged 5 and under, for the first time in human history. Read more

FT Baseline

Between them Barcelona’s Lionel Messi and Real Madrid’s Cristiano Ronaldo have scored more than 300 league goals in the last four seasons of Spain’s La Liga, but which player provides more goals for their team? Read more

Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo are the world’s top goalscorers. And next weekend will see them pitted against each other in what might be the biggest rivalry in sport: El Clásico, the match between Barcelona and Real Madrid.
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The recent fall in oil prices is bad news for Opec nations. For many the fall is large enough to put their governments into deficit. Only for the UAE, Qatar and Kuwait is the oil price above the level necessary for the government to run a surplus, the rest need an increase in prices or they’ll run a deficit. As well as telling us about the health of government finances, this may give some indication about Opec’s intentions to raise or lower production. To read more and explore our interactive graphic click here.

More than half of children born in Britain in 2013 had a mother above the age of 30. For the first time since the government began keeping track. The mean age has been rising since a record low in the mid-1970s, after it fell from 29 just before the second world war. The average used by the Office for National Statistics is standardised to take account of the changes in the age distribution of the whole and allows the trends over time to be understood.

A hundred years ago just four countries allowed women to vote: New Zealand, Australia, Finland and Norway. Two world wars accelerated the process, leading to big jumps in the number of countries that granted women the right to vote. Although the breakup of empires following world war one and two also led to big increases in the number of countries. By the year 2000, 147 countries allowed women to vote alongside men.