Monthly Archives: July 2013

Kate Allen

It’s often said that London is “full up”. But is this true?

At 8.3m people – more than 13 per cent of the total British population – London is booming. Many fear the pressure this is putting on services, infrastructure and housing. Heathrow airport is struggling to keep up with demand.

But the population of London isn’t that big, in relative terms – it isn’t even at a historic high. Read more >>

Anyone wondering why the issue of paying for long-term care is rising so swiftly up the political agenda need look no further than the latest UK census.

Much of the conversation about older people to date has revolved around estimates of the future numbers of elderly who will need care. Projections for the number of over-85s by 2031 have been steadily revised upwards in the past couple of decades:

2013 aging projections

But there has been little focus on what has already happened. Read more >>

Kate Allen

by Kate Allen and Simon Rabinovitch

The latest Chinese GDP figures leave little doubt that the days of double-digit growth for the world’s second-largest economy are well and truly over. Read more >>

Kate Allen

Marks and Spencer is facing troubled times, seemingly unable to stem the tide of customers flocking away from its clothing lines. This is just the latest development in a trend that M&S has been seeing for the past couple of years.

M&S like for like Read more >>

Kate Allen

by Claire Jones and Kate Allen

As today’s FT reports, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors’ latest poll of their members shows that the industry is very optimistic. They believe that activity in the housing market will rise dramatically in the coming months.

But how confident should we be that the surveyors have got it right? Read more >>

By Paul Hodges

Working women supercharged western economic growth from the 1980s, as they created the phenomenon of dual-income households for the first time in history. But today, this trend is reversing as women’s participation rates decline and their earnings plateau relative to men.

This major change risks undermining a key part of the US Federal Reserve’s strategy, which assumes that reducing the US unemployment rate to 6.5 per cent will help restore economic growth. The chart shows the reversal now underway:

 Read more >>