Monthly Archives: September 2013

By David Donald of the Center for Public Integrity and James Politi. Interactive graphic by Caroline Nevitt, Tom Pearson and Martin Stabe.

Map: US sequestration impact per capita

US sequestration impact per capita

Automatic US government spending cuts that took effect in March are threatening local economies across the country.

Counties that benefited from high levels of federal spending in recent years and weathered the recession better than the rest of the country could be especially hard-hit, an analysis of so-called “sequestration” by the Financial Times and the Center for Public Integrity has found.

Update, 3 October: The New Mexico county that is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, faces the greatest per-capita impact of any county in the United States, at more than $6,000 per person. Areas with military bases, such as Christian county, Kentucky, are also particularly hard hit. Across the 388 counties in the US that have one or more military installation, the sequestration impact per capita is $312. That is nearly twice as high as in the 2,727 counties without a military installation, where the sequestration impact per capita is $171.

Use the interactive graphic below to see how the impact is distributed around the United States and how your county fares.

 Read more

by Alistair Hayes

Another round of Premier League football, another weekend of foreign domination.

Of the 29 goals scored in last week’s Premier League, 21 were scored by non-England-qualified players, providing plenty of ammunition for the many England fans who contend that domestic players are being prevented from reaching world class by a seemingly endless stream of foreigners.

But would a reduction of overseas talent in the Premier League – whose players hold 91 nationalities – allow more English players to rise to international class? Would it be the panacea most onlookers – from the man in the pub to the national manager Roy Hodgson – seem to think it would be? Or is it that they are simply not good enough to compete on the international stage? Read more

by Roger Blitz, FT leisure industries correspondent

Going on a cruise conjures images of luxury travel, affordable only for the rich and those suddenly wondering what to do with their retirement savings.

Yet the price of a cruise for UK passengers has been steadily coming down, as cruise liners fight hard to convince consumers that their trips are affordable and value for money. Read more

Emily Cadman

By Emily Cadman and Callum Locke

Think data visualisation is a new thing? Think again. This fascinating map dates from 1893. Read more

Kate Allen

The Office for National Statistics’ release of data on UK share ownership has highlighted an important and far-reaching trend: the remarkable rise in share ownership by non-UK companies and individuals.

But the really crucial fact is that this comes mostly at the expense of the City’s traditional supremos: the insurance companies and pension funds.

Change in shareholdings Read more

Emily Cadman

Ed Miliband’s pledge at the Labour party conference to freeze consumer power prices until 2017 has pitted energy groups’ claims that a cap would hit much-needed investment against those who believe consumers are paying over the odds.

Here is a snapshot of what the currently available statistics show us about domestic power bills:

Relentless rise

Data from the Department of Energy and Climate Change is clear that consumers have been facing steadily rising energy bills with a real terms rise of over 40 per cent for direct debit consumers for electricity between 2007 and 2012.

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