Monthly Archives: December 2013

Kate Allen

by Kate Allen, Keith Fray and Patrick Mathurin

What are the most used (and perhaps overused) charts of 2013? 

Kate Allen

Six of the ten most expensive streets to buy a home in England and Wales are in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea, a study by Lloyds Bank has found.

The most expensive street was Egerton Crescent, which lies close to the Victoria and Albert and Natural History museums, where properties have a typical price tag of just under £7.4m. 

By Dan Thomas, map by John Burn-Murdoch

The animated map below shows a year’s worth of my mobile phone data obtained from my mobile operator, Three.

Every point that appears on the map is a phone call I made or text message I sent, with the location derived from the handset’s distance from the nearest antenna masts.

This news story has more detail on the reasons companies hold this data, the implications for your privacy and other cases where individuals have used data request laws to shed light on just how much personal information organisations hold. 

On Wednesday, the Office for National Statistics for the first time published regional growth figures for the UK. The obvious question that popped into my mind was to compare the Scottish growth with that published by the Scottish government.

I produced the following chart and wrote what looked like a cracking story because the ONS measure showed little over half the growth of the Scottish Government data, raising questions over the strength of Scotland’s economy.

Scottish officials were naturally upset with the ONS calculation and these were “experimental” figures, so the Scottish government’s data is most likely to be accurate. The difference, however is so large that it requires a bit more analysis. The ONS put out a statement in response to the FT’s article saying it had gaffed. But the statement did not help much.

 

Emily Cadman

What would the UK capital look like if you mapped its amenities only using open data? This image, created as a piece of art work for the London Open Data Summit, offers one answer.

 

By Claer Barrett and Kiran Stacey

Last autumn, George Osborne came to the Commons to present his Autumn Statement against the backdrop of a stagnating economy and a recent credit downgrade. His speech was full of language about continuing with “Plan A” despite ongoing concern over whether it was working.

This year was very different. With massive increases in the OBR’s growth forecasts, this was in effect the chancellor’s victory speech: in his words “the plan is working”. But there were also plenty of warnings against voting for Labour instead.

Here’s a quick, fun, look at how the language has changed….

The Chancellor was keen to put a positive gloss on continuing austerity while the economy is picking up, promising to “fix the roof when the sun is shining”.

2013 = 2 mentions
2012 = 0 mentions

Armed with a rosy set of forecasts, the Chancellor was able to boast
confidently about his economic strategy: “The plan is working.”

2013 = 3 mentions
2012 = 0 mentions