Emily Cadman

The Financial Times has won two prestigious Eppy awards for excellence in online journalism.

The UK Austerity Audit, a data-led project investigating the impact of sweeping benefit changes on local economies, won in the best investigative feature category and the FT picked up a second gong for the best mobile website. Read more

Emily Cadman

Tim Berners-Lee (c) Getty

New research from Sir Tim Berners-Lee’s World Wide Web Foundation and the Open Data Institute places the UK at the top of the league table for open data, ahead of the United States.

The report comes ahead of an open government summit in London where David Cameron is to announce a proposal for a public register of company ownership which will show who ultimately owns and controls businesses.

The survey of the state of open data in 77 counties, notes that 55 per cent of the countries surveyed now have open data initiatives, but reiterates familiar problems for all users of open data:

  • Valuable but potentially controversial datasets – such as company registers and land registers – are among the least likely to be openly released
  • When they are released, government datasets are often issued in inaccessible formats
  • Less than 7 per cent of the datasets surveyed are published in both machine readable forms and under open licences
  • Data is often released only in highly aggregated forms
  • Whilst countries might boast about releasing hundreds of datasets, if they aren’t the numbers demanded by citizens or those than can enable transparency or innovation there is little potential to deliver impact

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Emily Cadman

Most of the US statistical agencies are facing near-complete closure during the governmental shutdown, raising doubts about whether the US government will be able to stick to the planned data release schedule in the coming weeks.

The non-farm payroll numbers in particular are crucial information for the Federal Reserve as it weighs whether to ease back on its QE programme. Read more

Emily Cadman

By Emily Cadman and Callum Locke

Think data visualisation is a new thing? Think again. This fascinating map dates from 1893. Read more

Emily Cadman

Ed Miliband’s pledge at the Labour party conference to freeze consumer power prices until 2017 has pitted energy groups’ claims that a cap would hit much-needed investment against those who believe consumers are paying over the odds.

Here is a snapshot of what the currently available statistics show us about domestic power bills:

Relentless rise

Data from the Department of Energy and Climate Change is clear that consumers have been facing steadily rising energy bills with a real terms rise of over 40 per cent for direct debit consumers for electricity between 2007 and 2012.

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Emily Cadman

Latest official statistics released on Respect the Aged Day in Japan mark a symbolic milestone for the country with just shy of 32 million people – a quarter of the overall population – now over 65-years-old. (Hat tip to my colleague Ben McLannahan for spotting the numbers.)

Japan’s statistics agency also estimates that by 2035 the proportion of elderly people will rise to over 33 per cent.

Last year the IMF estimated that Japan’s working age population in 2050 would have fallen to the same size as it was at the end of the Second World War. Read more

Emily Cadman

Investors looking for information on Twitter ahead of its anticipated public offering have very little to go on: the company revealed nothing of its plans, other than a single 135 character tweet.

The one thing we do have some information on – drawn almost entirely from third party monitoring firms – is its user base. Launched in 2006, Global Web Index estimated in January this year the micro blogging site had 288 million active users and is the fastest growing social networking service. Read more

Emily Cadman

Chancellor George Osborne felt confident to state today that the UK is “turning a corner” and returning to health following a run of positive economic data. Here are the key charts supporting his claim, as well as a few on why it isn’t yet time to bring out the champagne.

The data the chancellor is banking on…

National Institute of Economic and Social Research (Niesr) last week estimated that the UK economy expanded at its fastest rate in more than three years in August.

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Emily Cadman

Enjoying a quiet August at work? Well maybe it is time to catch up on your privacy policy reading.

According to a new report from Deloitte it would take 25 minutes for an average user to read and comprehend a standard privacy policy. Based on ONS estimations that the average user visits 75 new websites a year, that equates to 31 hours a year. Read more

Emily Cadman

Further confirmation – if it was needed – of how rapidly the media industry is changing comes in today’s ONS statistical bulletin on internet access.

This year, for the first time, the majority of adults in the UK report reading news online (55 percent), up from 47 percent in 2012. And the pace of adoption has been rapid.

Whilst the growth in interest in online news offers opportunities for publishers, coincidentally, an interesting study out today from City University’s Neil Thurman provides a caveat. It suggests that despite the big increase in online readership substantially more reader time is spent on print editions than online.

But, the clear theme of the ONS bulletin is how deeply the internet has become embedded in daily life to an extent unimaginable only a few years ago. Read more

Emily Cadman

KPCB’s 2013 internet trends report from Mary Meeker is, as ever, a densely packed read (117 pages) that’s become essential reference material.

Whilst many of the trends identified are well known – the rise of mobile access to the internet and wearable technology – here are the five standout charts and tables that provide food for thought.

1. Sixty percent of the top 25 technology companies (ranked by market capitalisation) in the US were founded by first- and second-generation Americans

Rank Company Founder/co-founder Generation
1 Apple Steve Jobs 2nd – Syria
2 Google Sergey Brin 1st – Russia
3 IBM Herman Hollerith 2nd – Germany
4 Microsoft Bill Gates n/a
5 Oracle Larry Ellison 2nd – Russia
6 Amazon Jeff Bezos 2nd – Cuba
7 Cisco Leonard Bosack n/a
8 Intel Andrew Grove 1st – Hungary
9 Ebay Pierre Omidyar 1st – France
10 Facebook Mark Zuckerberg n/a
11 EMC Roger Marino 2nd – Italy
12 Hewlett-Packard William Hewlett n/a
13 Texas Instruments Cecil Green 1st – UK
14 Vmware Edouard Bugnion 1st – Switzerland
15 Priceline Jay Walker n/a
16 Automatic Data Processing Henry Taub 2nd – Poland
17 Salesforce March Benioff n/a
18 Dell Michael Dell n/a
19 Yahoo Jerry Yang 1st – Taiwan
20 Cognizant Technology Francisco D’Souza 1st – Nairobi
21 Adobe John Warnock n/a
22 Broadcom Henry Samueli 2nd – Poland
23 Intuit Scott Cook n/a
24 Linkedin Konstantin Guericke 1st – Germany
25 Symantec Gary Hendrix n/a

(Source: KPCB pg87, the Partnership for a New American Economy)

2. In the last five years, the amount of digital information created and shared has grown nine fold to nearly two zettabytes*– and is predicted to accelerate

Source: KPCB

*1 zettabyte= 1 trillion gigabytes. Source: IDC report “Extracting value from chaos Read more

Emily Cadman

Earnings growth, unemployment numbers, the number of people in work. All vital barometers of the UK’s economic picture and the reason why the monthly ONS labour market statistics report never fails to make headline news.

But alongside these well known statistics, there are a few lesser viewed numbers worth keeping an eye on to gain a more nuanced picture of the labour market.

Actual hours worked

As it says on the tin, this estimates the actual number of hours worked in the economy, seasonally adjusted. In May, this hit a new high – above the pre-recession peak.

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Emily Cadman

Spot quiz: name the leading global causes of death.

The big ones are easy to name – heart diseases, respiratory diseases, malaria, HIV/AIDS etc – but coming in at number eight, road traffic injuries is perhaps less intuitive.

Today’s World Health Organisation report on road safety is a call for more legislation – noting that only 7 percent of the world’s population is covered by legislation covering all five major traffic risks identified by the WHO. In practice this means laws against speeding and driving while intoxicated and requiring motorcycle helmets, seat belts, and child restraints.

It is a dense report worth digesting in more detail, but for now here are the highlight statistics from the report (all graphics courtesy WHO):

1. Although middle income countries – those with a gross national income per capital between $1,006 to $ 12,275 – have only half of the world’s cars, they have 80 per cent of the world’s traffic deaths – and deaths there have been increasing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Emily Cadman

Today’s autumn statement saw the Office for Budget Responsibility slash its economic forecasts for the UK – the FT’s Claire Jones explains the significance of it here.

So here is a quick chart looking at how sharply expectations for two of the key measures – public sector net debt as percentage of GDP and GDP percentage change – have changed between the budget earlier this year and now. Read more

Emily Cadman

One of the more interesting aspects of Friday’s ONS release on the UK internet access patterns is the reasons why households don’t have internet access.

Much of the data release is as you would expect: more households have internet access, and more people are using computers daily, a trend especially noticeable among the young. Read more

Emily Cadman

Whilst ancedotes about Olympic fever are two a penny at the moment, do we actually have any evidence about how interested people are? Well these power demand charts, courtesy of the National Grid, perhaps offer one rough and ready way of looking at how engaged the stay at home audience has been at key points.

Firstly, of all the highest TV audience to date – the opening ceremony. The annotations on the charts are from analysts at the National Grid.

The pink line shows electricity demand for the equivalent Friday a year ago, and the blue line the actual demand during the opening ceremony – which drew an average of 22.4m viewers, the highest since 1998, and a peak audience at 9.45pm of 26.9m. Read more

European banks have reduced their loan exposure in the US in the past few years as contagion fears hit investment appetite. The following interactive graphic shows how these loan portfolios ballooned in the months leading up to the crisis and then were pulled back in the months and years following the financial crisis.

Calculating the economic impact of the Olympics is a Herculean task with different meanings for different authors. At its most basic, some try to estimate the effect on national output of staging the games and building the venues. More sophisticated studies attempt a proper economic cost-benefit analysis, in which the costs and benefits of building the infrastructure are measured as well as the costs and benefits of hosting the event. For London 2012, a sophisticated analysis has proved beyond most researchers.

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Crafting a reliable leading indicator is a tricky business in the world’s most mature economies, with analysts using a cocktail of different data points to try to get ahead of the curve in forecasting growth. In a developing nation, especially one that is growing and changing as quickly as China, the task is much harder because there are few consistent reference points to compare.

Yet in recent years, several leading indicators for China have garnered attention after doing a good job of predicting the economy’s slowdown at the end of 2008 and its subsequent recovery.

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Emily Cadman

Should we be most concerned about young men not fulfilling their potential, or young girls? Boys right? Barely a week goes by without concerned stories that they are being left behind in the classroom, or in the race for top degrees.

But a counter intuitive chart in today’s Office for National Statistics release on education as component of national well being, shows that isn’t necessarily the case.

It shows quite clearly that it is girls losing their way post secondary school. The spikes in the graph are Q3 data showing the immediate period post secondary school.

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