Federica Cocco

For ten years a majority of Britons have said that public spending should not be increased, but recently there was a move back towards support for more spending.

Now the public evenly split over whether it should be increased or kept at the same level. Read more

Federica Cocco

Fewer people died as a result of the cold last year, the ONS has reported, while the summer’s heatwave proved particularly deadly.

The increase in deaths during non-winter months is a concern to statisticians as it could mask high excess mortality in winter months. Read more

Federica Cocco

Since 2005 the number of displaced migrants in the Middle East has grown fourfold, from about 5m to 23m. Much of this rise was the result of recent conflict in Syria, Iraq and Yemen.

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Federica Cocco

10 percent of jobs held by under-30s in OECD were lost from 2007 and 2015. The number of employed youth halved in Spain, Greece and Ireland.

Some countries, like Luxembourg and Chile actually saw an increase in the youth employment rate. This is mainly attributable to more young women taking up work. Read more

Federica Cocco

Israel and the US have the highest poverty rates among OECD countries, according to this year’s Society at a Glance.

In both cases the problem appears to center around the lack of government intervention. Read more

Federica Cocco

The productivity gap between top performing regions and others has widened by almost 60 per cent in two decades, according to a new OECD report released this week.

The difference in labour productivity between the top 10 per cent most productive OECD regions and the bottom 75 per cent grew from $15,200 to $24,000, in average GDP per worker, between 1995 and 2013. Read more

Federica Cocco

The OECD has found that although inequality across different OECD countries has narrowed in the last 20 years, within their own borders countries are witnessing increasing inequality. Mexico has the widest the gap between the richest and the poorest regions in terms of per capita GDP.

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Federica Cocco

According to recent estimates from the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a bipartisan budget watchdog group, Hillary Clinton’s economic plans would increase the US’s national debt by $200 billion over a decade above current law levels, while Donald Trump’s plans would increase the debt by $5.3 trillion.

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Federica Cocco

A recent poll showed only 6.8 per cent of the public has a favourable opinion of Farc, the Colombian rebels who had vowed to disarm and integrate in political and civilian life if the peace deal passed in a landmark referendum. Colombia’s Catholic Church refrained from endorsing the deal.

Federica Cocco

Pew’s latest survey of the American electorate has found that a major factor in candidate support is disliking the opponent. For Trump supporters, opposition to Clinton is among the most frequently cited factors, followed by his status as a political outsider and his policies.

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Federica Cocco

International migration is growing once again, having tailed off after the financial crisis, an OECD report released this week has found.

4.8 million people migrated permanently to OECD countries in 2015, a 10 per cent increase on 2014 and surpassing the previous record set in 2007. Read more

Federica Cocco

How is a country’s wealth affected by removing its capital city? The Cologne Institute for Economic Research set to find out.

Factoring out London and its residents, the 2014 per capita GDP fell by 11 percent. Nearly one out of every four pounds of the British GDP is earned in its capital city. Read more

Federica Cocco

The US Census Bureau delivered an unexpectedly rosy report on poverty and incomes, which showed the biggest improvement in decades on both fronts. The median household income in 2015 was $56,500, up 5.2 per cent from the previous year, the largest single-year increase since records began.

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Federica Cocco

Britain’s unemployment-to-vacancy ratio for April to June 2016 dipped to its lowest level since the start of 2005, below its pre-downturn average. According to the Office for National Statistics this may reflect a tightening of the labour market.

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Federica Cocco

The US Treasury Department has run a census of same-sex couples three years after the Supreme Court gave them federal recognition.

Using figures from tax returns jointly filed by same-sex couples in 2014 with their Social Security records, researchers found there were 183,280 same-sex marriages in the US that year – equivalent to roughly 0.33 percent of all marriages. Read more

Federica Cocco

Turkish, Romanian and Nigerian migrants are the least welcome in the UK, according to a recent survey of 1,668 Britons from YouGov, which put migrants from Ireland, the US, Canada and Australia at the top.

The survey asked whether more immigrants from a number of countries should be allowed into the UK, versus the same amount, less, or none at all. A net figure was then derived from each answer. Read more

Federica Cocco

Donald Trump’s hopes of being elected to the White House are crumbling, according to statistic-driven website FiveThirtyEight whose forecast factors in economic and historic data as well as polls. Trump’s campaign has been in trouble ever since he criticised the parents of an American Muslim soldier killed on duty. According to the New York Times, “no modern candidate who has trailed by this much a few weeks after the conventions has gone on to win the presidency.”

Federica Cocco

UK real wages​ ​have ​fell by​ -10.4​ ​per cent​ between 2007 and the end of 2015, ​the most severe​ fall in the OECD along with Greece, according to TUC analysis​. Apart from Portugal, all other OECD countries saw real wages increase. The UK is the only country in this grouping to have seen wages go down couples with a strong performance in employment. The UK’s employment rate is indeed at a record levels, some 5 percentage points above the OECD average.

Federica Cocco

Russia is the only country of the G20 major economies where people would rather Donald Trump was the next President of the US than Hillary Clinton, according to a survey of 20,000 people in every G20 country.

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Federica Cocco

The fate of EU migrants in the UK hangs in the balance, but the UK government has stated that those who have lived “continuously and lawfully” in the country for at least five years will automatically have a permanent right to reside.

The five years will start to count once Britain has officially left the European Union, which will most likely happen two years after Article 50 is triggered thereby starting the ‘divorce’ proceedings. Read more