The COP21 climate change calculator allows users to track and project greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from China, US, EU1, India, Russia, Brazil, Japan, Canada, Australia and the Rest of the World (“Others”), over the period 1870 to 2100. China, US, EU, India, Russia, Brazil, Japan, Canada are the highest GHG emitters in the world. Together with Australia, they accounted for two-thirds of global GHG emissions in 2010.

To learn more about the underlying data, methodology for computation of temperature values and key messages from the COP21 calculator please read on… Read more

By Giles Wilkes

  © Charlie Bibby/FT

Labour should be wary of giving credence to a very suspect number.

The £93bn figure now routinely used to evaluate the scale of “corporate welfare” in Britain is badly misleading. If the Labour Party is to re-establish its economic credibility, it needs to give the number a very wide berth. Read more

This is a guest post by Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Chairman and Co-Founder, Open Data Institute

The UK is a world leader in open data. Open data is data that is published for anyone to use for any purpose at no cost. Open data about transport, spending, health, crime, the environment, mapping and much more is now freely available from the UK government. We are also seeing companies release some of their data as open data. Open data is not usually personal data unless it is released as aggregate or anonymised data that does not identify an individual. Read more

Guest post by Paul Hodges

Demographic change is creating major headwinds for the US economy, as confirmed by its disappointing first quarter GDP growth of 0.2 per cent. Consumption accounts for around 70 per cent of US GDP, and new data on household spending from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) demonstrate how the ageing of the US population is creating major structural change in the economy. Read more

Polls suggest that the UK general election on May 7 will result in a hung parliament. A coalition, or a minority government backed by a “confidence and supply” deal with other parties, is likely to come to power.

This interactive graphic shows the scenarios possible based on the current projection from Read more

This is a guest post by Liz Carolan, International Development Manager at the Open Data Institute

Literally translated Burkina Faso means “land of the upright people”. It has long been one of West Africa’s most stable countries, despite having one of world’s lowest GDPs and being surrounded by countries with serious security issues, like Mali and Nigeria.

In October 2014 Burkina Faso made its way onto TV screens around the world – a 36 hour popular uprising forced long-term leader Blaise Compaoré from office. An interim administration was put in place and the first elections for thirty years without Compaoré’s candidacy are planned for 11th October 2015.

And now the country hopes that open data and transparency will offer a stabilising force. It sees open data as a vehicle for distinguishing itself from the previous administration – open, transparent, and better at engaging with the public. Read more

2013 protest in Manchester against widening pay gap  © Getty

By David Oakley

Britain’s top 10 highest paid bosses earn more than a combined £100m in the most recent financial year. For these top earners, their £118.9m aggregate pay packet was 27 per cent higher than what they received in the previous year.

This – at a time when real household median incomes in the UK is only just returning to 2007-2008 levels – is likely to put executive pay firmly back into the spotlight as the UK general election approaches and shareholders gather at upcoming annual general meetings. Read more

What would happen if the UK general election were held tomorrow? Our interactive graphic shows a projected redistribution of parliamentary seats based on the latest available polling data.

It is updated regularly from data published on, a website run by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia, the London School of Economics and Durham University. Read more

Guest post by Paul Hodges

The UK’s ageing population is creating major headwinds for economic growth, data published last month Office of National Statistics shows. Read more

By David Blood and Aleksandra Wisniewska

More than 2,500 people are attending the World Economic Forum in Davos this week, but how are they connected outside of the picturesque alpine town?

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There are signs that the 40 per cent fall in oil prices might not deliver the expected stimulus. Chris Giles assesses the outlook for the global economy while FT reporters look at the prospects for key exporters and importers.

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The global financial crisis of 2008 had a big impact on migration, with a million fewer people a year moving to another country on average after 2010 than in the 10 years before. But since 1960, the percentage of the global population classified as migrants has remained steady at roughly 3 per cent, largely as a result of population growth. The OECD last year found that if there was a cost from new migrants it was generally small.

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Global consumption of farmed fish and seafood is set to exceed that of wild fish this year, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation. With the total traded fish market worth $136bn in 2013, this turning point for the industry ensures a more stable food supply but it also carries environmental risks.

Click to read more Read more

US prosecutors are offering immunity deals to junior traders in London as they try to gather evidence against banks and more senior staff in the investigation into alleged currency market manipulation. The Forex scandal is, at its core, a story about alleged wrongful sharing of information to boost trading profits. In this interactive, the FT has compiled 30 foreign exchange traders and sales staff who so far have been suspended, placed on leave or fired amid regulatory investigations that started in 2013. Read more

by Gavin Jackson and Keith Fray

On Tuesday the International Monetary Fund released its latest World Economic Outlook. A striking new finding emerges: the seven largest emerging markets are now bigger, in gross domestic product terms, than the long established G7 group of industrialised nations, when measured at purchasing power parity (PPP). Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Aleksandra Wisniewska

Scotland voted on Thursday to remain in the United Kingdom, with the pro-union camp securing 55.3 per cent of the vote. Read more

By Tom Burgis, Caroline Nevitt, and Martin Stabe

Chinese investment in postwar Angola set the template for major infrastructure deals in Africa over the past decade. FT’s Tom Burgis explains Beijing’s quest for a continent’s resources. Read more

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by Henry Foy, ‎Automotive Correspondent

Henry Ford, the grandfather of the car industry and Tesla CEO Elon Musk, its current saviour (or enfant terrible depending on your point of view and stockholding) had similar views on spreading warm and fuzzy love around with rivals.

“If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself,” Ford once said. “A business that makes nothing but money is a poor business,” another Ford pronouncement, is certainly a view shared by Musk – who has said making electric cars successful is more important to him than making his company successful.

But Ford would be turning in his Detroit grave at Musk’s latest decision to make all of Tesla’s patents availble, free of cost, to its rivals.

Ford — who ironically broke the famous Selden patent monopoly that allowed the US car industry to get off its feet — loved patents. He racked up more than 150, and liked to be in control of every aspect of his cars. That control has percolated throughout the car industry since, as rivals look to corner emerging technologies.

But what exactly is in the box of secrets that Musk has opened to the world — and to his competitors? Read more

By Paul Hodges

The toy industry is going through difficult times as Lex highlighted recently. Profits at Toys R Us have halved since 2009, whilst Mattel is suffering due to poor sales of Barbie dolls. A dismal Christmas at the UK’s Mothercare led the departure of its chief executive. Read more