Our new unemployment tracker shows the latest jobs data across the European Union, including top-line figures for each country’s constituent regions. The most recent figures are for September 2014.

You can also download the latest data using the link beneath the graphic. Read more

Updated May 02 2015


Note: the five parties shown are those for which every polling company in our poll-of-polls provides individual figures.

UK voters will elect a new parliament in a general election on May 7. Our poll-of-polls tracks all national-level voting intention polling figures going back to the 2010 election – the dots on our chart – and then calculates a rolling score for each party adjusted for recency and different pollsters. Read more

In 1961, the average UK 20-something sat in the upper third of the income distribution after deducting housing costs, but the subsequent 50 years have seen a dramatic reversal in their fortunes. Explore the UK’s widening generation gap over income with this interactive graphic. Read more

Roger Federer was eliminated from the Australian Open when he lost a match in which he won the majority of the points.

Was it a one-off, or a sign of an underlying issue? And how does his rival Rafael Nadal compare when it comes to winning the biggest points in tennis? Find out in our interactive graphic Read more

156 players have reached the top ten of the ATP men’s singles rankings since they were established in 1973. How do they compare on success and longevity?

Find out in our interactive graphic Read more

The UK’s ‘two speed’ housing market is not a novel concept, but new figures highlight the regional and political split like never before.

Use our interactive graphic to explore how geography and politics divide fortunes in Britain’s property market. Read more

It is said that money makes the world go round, but in football’s transfer market we can be a little more specific on that money’s provenance. Our interactive graphic explores the net spend of the 265 clubs in world football to have each spent £10m or more in total since 1980, grouped by country.

Any guesses on the identity of the country whose clubs spend the most? Read more

Statistics suggest that it is was never a successful tactic beyond gaining short term momentum Read more

Manufacturing and technology giants Samsung, Hyundai, SK and LG are examples of chaebol – multinational Korean conglomerates with labyrinthine ownership structures, often controlled by the founding family. Use our interactive graphic to explore the relationships between companies in each chaebol Read more

They cost billions of dollars, symbolise economic power and are photographed by millions, but the world’s tallest buildings also compete on a lesser known measure that pushes the limits of modern engineering: elevator speed. These ultra-fast lifts can reach speeds of 20 metres per second (45 mph) and feature technologies that use heat resistant brakes, mitigate excess vibration and adjust for air pressure to prevent ear blockages. Our graphic shows the top speeds of elevators in eight of the world’s tallest and most famous buildings, and how far they have traveled since this web page loaded Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the latest instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked ahead to the ATP Tour Finals, the climax of the men’s tennis season.

The tournament is played on a hard court surface, which goes some way to nullifying the relative advantages afforded to big serving and big returning players by grass and clay courts respectively. But where exactly does hard court fall between those two extremes, and what can this tell us about its impact on the playing styles of grass and clay specialists? Read more

The current Ebola virus outbreak has claimed more than 4,000 lives in West Africa, as well as one in the US where the victim had been visiting Liberia, the country with the highest death toll so far.

Our interactive graphic tracks the outbreak’s spread since the World Health Organisation first issued a global alert in March 2014

 Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the latest instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at Serena Williams’ dominance of women’s tennis over the last decade.

Williams has won 17 of the 43 grand slam tournaments she has entered since the 2002 French Open, and the reasons for her success can be explained with a look at performance data for the top players of the modern era Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the fourth instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at how overtaking in Formula One has changed over the years.

For decades it appeared the aggressive passing move was a dying art, but everything changed in 2011. Read on to find out why, and what it means for this year’s title tussle between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg. Read more

With the 40th Ryder Cup about to get underway at Gleneagles, we wanted to know if we’ve been misled by one of golf’s greatest myths.

The saying goes that you “drive for show, and putt for dough” – in other words an impressive shot off the tee may win you a few whoops from the fans, but it’s your putting game that will win or lose tournaments.

We used data from the PGA Tour to analyse the relative impacts of the long and short game on players’ success. Read more

The One North report proposes to upgrade infrastructure in the north of England, focusing on links between five cities: Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle and Sheffield. One way of showing how well linked the five cities are is to look at commuter flows. This interactive graphic shows total flows between the five cities, based on data from the 2011 UK census.  Read more

Water scarcity is starting to hit the balance sheets of multinationals, who have spent more than $84bn managing their water usage in the last three years.

The Financial Times has gathered data on 78 corporate water projects around the globe, including desalination plants, hydroelectric power stations and river course modification. Read more

In case you’ve forgotten, England did take part in the 2014 World Cup. But despite uncharacteristically low expectations from the watching English public, Roy Hodgson’s side slunk under this low bar, flying home after two defeats and a goalless draw with the global footballing powerhouse Costa Rica.

What went wrong? Countless theories abound – some better than others – but some relatively simple maths may be able to explain at least one of the factors involved: statistically speaking, England were bereft of luck. Read more

736 players have travelled to Brazil for the World Cup. The diagrams below show how their individual skillsets help create their national team’s identity. Read more

The full regional breakdown of results and turnout in Ukraine’s presidential election is shown in the interactive graphic above, including figures for individual stations within Donetsk and Lugansk. Read more