This interactive graphic shows the full results of India’s general election. Narendra Modi and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party swept to power in the world’s largest democracy, winning a straight majority without the need for allies – the first such victory for a single party in three decades. Read more

Under a remote mountainside in Guinea, one of west Africa’s poorest but most mineral-rich nations, lies one of the world’s biggest undeveloped deposits of iron ore.

Developing the Simandou deposit and building the railway and port required to export the ore are expected to cost an estimated $20bn – three times Guinea’s gross domestic product. Read more

Elections for the European Parliament will take place between May 22 and May 25, against a backdrop of a slow economic recovery and fears of a rise in populist parties such as Britain’s anti-EU UK Independence party led by Nigel Farage and France’s far-right National Front, led by Marine Le Pen.

This interactive graphic shows the results of the previous election in 2009. Read more

As the European elections approach at the end of May, Alex Barker, the FT’s EU correspondent, reports from Brussels on the growing power of the European Parliament in shaping the future of the EU.

In September, the Scottish people will vote in a referendum that could see the country break away from the rest of the UK.

Using polling data collated by the UK Polling Report and What Scotland Thinks, we have analysed all polls conducted in the past year that used the referendum question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?”

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In less than nine months, the Scottish people will vote in a referendum which could see the country break away from the rest of the United Kingdom.

A recent poll conducted by ICM for the Scotland on Sunday newspaper suggests support for independence is on the rise. Should the pro-union Better Together campaign be worried?

Probably not.

No matter what politicians claim regarding the closeness of the race, an FT analysis of the existing polling data shows that the “Yes” and “No” vote have remained relatively constant over the last year, with just over 30 per cent of Scots favouring independence, and 50 per cent wishing to remain within the union. Around 15 per cent are undecided.

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Here are some interactive graphics we have spotted elsewhere this week that are worth a look:

Google labs interactive graphic

Small arms and ammunition – imports and exports
Google labs have published a very interesting visualisation of the global small arms trade, based on data provided by the UN’s COMTRADE database and analysed by the Peace Research Institute Oslo. Explore imports and exports of ammunition, civilian and military weapons between 1992 and 2010 from 250 territories and find out who is selling what to whom. Beautifully designed and easy to navigate, but the usual caveats of unreliable data from China, North Korea, Iran and others still apply. Read more

The Olympics are finally here and the web is awash with interactive graphics and visualisations.

Here are the ones it’s worth taking a second look at:

Dressed for a world record?
This is a must-view for swimming fans. The invention of slick, hi-tech bodysuits enabled a series of world records to be broken, but since the suits were banned in 2010 few records have been beaten. The Washington Post looks at the evolution of Olympic swimwear and tracks this against world records in each swimming discipline. Read more