Data

Manufacturing and technology giants Samsung, Hyundai, SK and LG are examples of chaebol – multinational Korean conglomerates with labyrinthine ownership structures, often controlled by the founding family. Use our interactive graphic to explore the relationships between companies in each chaebol Read more

Migration from the European Union is a pretty controversial issue in Britain. Particularly in politics: the strength of the anti-EU UK Independence Party and the anxiety it causes for the two major parties is thought to be linked to public antipathy towards the high-levels of migration that followed the accession of eight eastern european countries to the EU in 2004 (EUA8).

Others have pointed out that perhaps something else is going on. The British public tend to overestimate the proportion of the country who are migrants and have been in favour of lower levels of migration for the past 50 years, even when the country was experiencing net emigration. So perhaps migration is just a vehicle for other concerns.

So I thought I would look at the relationship between the number of migrants in an area and public opinion about migration. Read more

That might be changing. The British government and a few others including Canada, Costa Rica, Colombia and Paraguay are working towards opening up the information about public procurement through an ‘open contracting data standard’.

The first version is launched today and sets out a technical standard for the data and documents that ought to be published at each stage of the contracting process, from the invitation to tender through to completion. Read more

US prosecutors are offering immunity deals to junior traders in London as they try to gather evidence against banks and more senior staff in the investigation into alleged currency market manipulation. The Forex scandal is, at its core, a story about alleged wrongful sharing of information to boost trading profits. In this interactive, the FT has compiled 30 foreign exchange traders and sales staff who so far have been suspended, placed on leave or fired amid regulatory investigations that started in 2013. Read more

FT Baseline

Which pieces are the most likely to be captured in the early rounds? What about the longest survivors? Which remain fringe actors early on before being thrown into the action as the stakes rise? Read more

Despite a 40-year ban on crude oil exports the US energy trade balance has steadily improved over the past few years as exports of refined products soar.

 

US stocks tend to perform well in the period directly following midterm elections; only once since 1950 has the Dow not risen in the quarter following an election and that was in 2002 during George W. Bush’s first term. On average the index has risen by almost 10 per cent after midterm elections and rose by 8 per cent after the 2010 election during Obama’s first term.

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the latest instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked ahead to the ATP Tour Finals, the climax of the men’s tennis season.

The tournament is played on a hard court surface, which goes some way to nullifying the relative advantages afforded to big serving and big returning players by grass and clay courts respectively. But where exactly does hard court fall between those two extremes, and what can this tell us about its impact on the playing styles of grass and clay specialists? Read more

Martin Stabe

The European Central Bank on Sunday released the long-awaited results of its stress test.

The test, conducted on 130 euro area lenders, requires banks to have common equity tier one ratios of more than 5.5 per cent even under a “adverse scenario” of falling economic output, rising unemployment and declining house prices.

The stress test found 25 banks had capital shortfalls under the adverse scenario applied to banks’ balance sheets as of the end of 2013. However, that number fell to 13 once capital raised by the banks in 2014 was taken into account.

This sortable table shows a summary of the results of the stress test, including any shortfall after net capital raised since December 2013 is taken into account. Read more

Subscription revenues for video on demand services like Netflix are set to grow by nearly 30 per cent during 2014 but will still account for only 2 per cent of the total market for pay television. North America and Europe currently lead by market share with growth of 29 and 19 per cent respectively this year, but in emerging regions where on demand is more novel growth will exceed 50 per cent in 2014.

The amount of meat produced worldwide quadrupled in the 50 years before 2011. In per capita terms this means it almost doubled in the same period, in 2011 enough meat was produced for each person to have 42.2kg a year. The rise in global meat production coincides with the growth in productivity and income and highlights the pressure that the demands of that growth places on natural resources.

Even before the dispute with Russia began battering their economy, hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians fled their country looking for a better life elsewhere. Ukrainians are now the largest group of migrants from non-European Union countries applying for residence in the bloc.

Eurostat said on Wednesday that the number of Ukrainians issued with EU residence permits rose by 48 per cent in 2013. Most Ukrainians moved to Poland looking for work. In total 236,691 permits were granted to Ukrainians, which means that the country has overtaken the US as the most common source country for migrants to the EU — India has also overtaken the US to take second place. Read more

Emily Cadman

What to do about British manufacturing? There is hardly a politician in the country who hasn’t called for the sector to get a boost. But the Office for National Statistics is set to stress today that popular perceptions manufacturing is disappearing from the UK are wide of the mark.

New analysis, to be presented by ONS chief economist Joe Grice at a conference on the changing shape of manufacturing, will focus on the sector’s move up the value chain despite an unquestioned reduction in employee numbers. Read more

FT Baseline

Between them Barcelona’s Lionel Messi and Real Madrid’s Cristiano Ronaldo have scored more than 300 league goals in the last four seasons of Spain’s La Liga, but which player provides more goals for their team? Read more

A hundred years ago just four countries allowed women to vote: New Zealand, Australia, Finland and Norway. Two world wars accelerated the process, leading to big jumps in the number of countries that granted women the right to vote. Although the breakup of empires following world war one and two also led to big increases in the number of countries. By the year 2000, 147 countries allowed women to vote alongside men.

The current Ebola virus outbreak has claimed more than 4,000 lives in West Africa, as well as one in the US where the victim had been visiting Liberia, the country with the highest death toll so far.

Our interactive graphic tracks the outbreak’s spread since the World Health Organisation first issued a global alert in March 2014

 Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the latest instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at Serena Williams’ dominance of women’s tennis over the last decade.

Williams has won 17 of the 43 grand slam tournaments she has entered since the 2002 French Open, and the reasons for her success can be explained with a look at performance data for the top players of the modern era Read more

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

In the fourth instalment of The Baseline, our weekly feature on sports statistics, we looked at how overtaking in Formula One has changed over the years.

For decades it appeared the aggressive passing move was a dying art, but everything changed in 2011. Read on to find out why, and what it means for this year’s title tussle between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg. Read more

Keith Fray

As the Financial Times this week examines China’s expansion in Europe, China made an economic leap forward: new data now forecasts that China will officially overtake the US this year to become the world’s largest economy.

Measuring gross domestic product using purchasing power parity (PPPs) the International Monetary Fund now estimates China’s GDP at $17.6tn, against the US’s $17.4tn.

PPPs are an attempt – far from perfect – to account for varying price levels between countries, particularly in goods and services not open to international competition. PPPs make a big difference. According to the IMF, China’s GDP this year measured in simple dollars, making no adjustment for relative prices, is $10.4tn. Read more

No one knows how many Chinese people live in Europe.

The United Nations estimated Europe’s China-born population at 886,882 in 2010, its most recent count, while Chinese-based social scientists put it somewhere between 2m and 3m.

Why, in the age of big data, is there so much uncertainty where our neighbours are from? Read more