Data

Valentina Romei

Keith Fray and Valentina Romei

During the six years from 2007 to 2013 the annual output of the Greek economy fell by more than 26 per cent. On the FT’s statistics desk we wanted to know how that fall ranked compared with sustained periods of economic retrenchment and dislocation in other countries. Read more

Valentina Romei

The number of hours worked per person in employment has fallen in most advanced countries since the financial crisis. The UK is among the few countries where the shift toward shorter-hours employment has been reversed. Read more

Valentina Romei

In the last week, much of the discussion around Greece’s travails has been around the need for further modernisation and progress made since the crisis. On one side the economist Francesco Giavazzi emphasised the continued need for structural reforms, while Karl Whelan stressed the huge improvements made by the Greek government in terms of reforms, public spending and fiscal consolidation.

Measuring a country’s level of “modernity” is not easy, but the following charts attempt to show how Greece compares and what has changed since the financial crisis. Read more

Valentina Romei

Leo and his mother walk past a primary school in South-East London, just around the corner from their house. The 4 year-old asks why he is not attending that school, as they still have to walk another five minutes to the bus station, spend 40 minutes on the bus and then walk another five minutes to reach the school he actually attends.

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Valentina Romei

Connections with family and friends are the most popular route to a job in Spain, with close to half of Spaniards and two-thirds of foreigners using this method. Only a small proportion used job agencies.

Emily Cadman

The main thing international businesses want to see from the UK government, just so happens to be the one thing that just is not going to happen at any point soon.

Forty-three per cent of respondents to the latest FT/Economist Global Business Barometer said that committing Britain to staying in the EU was in the top three most important things the new government could do for business. Read more

Valentina Romei

“The good school” is the title of the reform to the Italian educational system proposed by the Prime Minister Matteo Renzi that was approved by the lower chamber of parliament on the 20th of May and that now needs to be approved by the upper chamber in the next few weeks.

In the words of the Ministry of Education Stefania Giannini the reform is aimed at improving “autonomy, transparency, responsibility, fair valuation and merits” in the educational system. The reforms involve funding for hiring thousands of temporary teachers on permanent contracts, more training, the introduction of a one year trial for new teachers and larger school autonomy among other – sometimes controversial – measures. Read more

FT Baseline

Last week we looked at the top goalscorers in modern European football, focusing on the importance of remaining injury free for those who go on to become true greats.

This time around we’re taking a different view of the same data to tell another side to the story: the important distinction between a clinical finisher and a reliable source of goals. Read more

Valentina Romei

The growth in Chinese import has been slowing since the start of 2011 and actually contracted in the first months of this year due to falling demand and lower commodity prices.

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Valentina Romei

Gross domestic product (GDP) – the product generated in a country- is similar to the gross national product (GNP) – the income of the country’s residents, in most countries.

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Emily Cadman

(c) Getty Images

After a month of silence from the Bank of England as a result of purdah – the constitutionally imposed pre-election quiet period for public bodies – front row seats for Wednesday’s inflation report are at a premium. Read more

A network analysis of the Twitter conversations about the general election sheds some light on the hype around Labour in the run-up to the big day.  Read more

Most seats in the UK are projected to declare the winner between 2am and 5am in the general election held today. Labour leaning seats, which tend to be in urban areas and have lower turnout, are often the first to declare.

When the Conservative Liberal Democrat coalition took office in 2010 the majority of the public told pollsters that the economy was the most important issue facing the country. As the economy has recovered and the financial sector appeared more stable, it declined in importance in voters minds.

However, concern about the economy fell faster and further than worries about unemployment. In fact the percentage saying that unemployment is one of the important issues facing the UK is roughly the same as it was in 2010 despite record job growth. Either voters aren’t paying attention or they’re using unemployment as a shorthand for wider concerns about insecurity and the conditions of employment. Read more

Here’s a simple question: which of Britain’s parliamentary constituencies have seen the biggest job market recoveries since the coalition government took office in 2010?

The answer, I thought, might well generate a news story in the week of the UK general election. So I downloaded a time-series of the number of Jobseeker’s Allowance benefit claimants in each constituency. (I used JSA claimant data because, when you’re looking at small geographical areas, they’re far more accurate than survey-based measures of employment and unemployment.) Read more

FT Baseline

By John Burn-Murdoch and Gavin Jackson

Over a typical Premier League season we would expect any given team to pick up more points per match against weaker opponents than better ones, relative to its own strength. Read more

New York, Rome, Berlin and Mexico City. Which is the odd one out?

It is Rome. It missed out on being in the top 10 cities out of 55 indexed by Youthful Cities, a Toronto-based organisation that has started ranking metropolises based on their ability to meet the demands of their young residents (aged 15-29).

New York topped the list, with London coming in second and Berlin third. More interestingly Mexico City slipped into the top 10, the only non US, Canadian or European city to do so. The mix gets more interesting for the top 20, with the likes of Tel Aviv, Hong Kong and Santiago making the cut. (See full post for list.) Read more

Chris Giles

The Tories must be cursing the Office for National Statistics. Just when they wanted to trumpet solid growth in the economy nine days before the general election, pesky official figures suggest growth of only 0.3 per cent in the first quarter. There is no doubt this is a bad figure. As the chart shows, it is the worst quarterly growth rate since the end of 2012.

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Our new unemployment tracker shows the latest jobs data across the European Union, including top-line figures for each country’s constituent regions. The most recent figures are for September 2014.

You can also download the latest data using the link beneath the graphic. Read more